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Review of Xiaomi 14 Ultra, price and specifications

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Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Review of Xiaomi 14 Ultra, price, technical specifications, design, display, software, hardware, battery life and charging, and other specifications of this phone.

Review of Xiaomi 14 Ultra, price and specifications

Introduction

A few small but significant upgrades to the camera system, tweaks to the build and display, and the obligatory chipset update – we can’t be mad at the shortlist for the Xiaomi 14 Ultra because last year’s model was one of Xiaomi’s best camera phones.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

In fact, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra does not deviate much from its predecessor. The original camera had a 1-inch sensor and dual-aperture lens in 2023, the 2024 uses a newer 1-inch sensor and turns it into a truly variable aperture (with intermediate steps). Meanwhile, the zoom cameras (two of them, which apparently need to be called Ultra), focus closer to the table, and their longer lens is also slightly brighter.

On the outside, Xiaomi has replaced the old model’s Corning-branded glass with an interior concoction that should be more durable (the stars, of course), and the non-leatherette has also been improved. A new aluminum alloy is used for the frame on the international version, while China also gets a titanium option on top. It looks like a win.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

The improvement in the display department is hardly noticeable, but there is a promise of slightly more brightness (hardly a game-changer), while the new Snapdragon is the new Snapdragon – better than the old version, more or less the same across all 2024 models.

Xiaomi has decided not to bother with battery capacity or charging speed on the global variant (the Chinese version gets an extra 300mAh), and we think we could have used a little longer life – maybe get it elsewhere.

Specifications of Xiaomi 14 Ultra at a glance:

  • Body: 161.4×75.3×9.2mm, 220g; Glass front (Xiaomi Shield Glass), glass back or eco-leather, titanium (grade 5), or aluminum alloy frame. IP68 dust/water resistant (up to 1.5m for 30 minutes).
  • Display: 6.73-inch LTPO AMOLED, 68B color, 120Hz, Dolby Vision, HDR10+, 1000 nits (typ), 3000 nits (peak), 1440x3200px resolution, 20:9 aspect ratio, 522ppi.
  • Chipset: Qualcomm SM8650-AB Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 (4 nm): Octa-core (1x 3.3 GHz Cortex-X4 and 3x 3.2 GHz Cortex-A720 and 2x 3.0 GHz Cortex-A720 and 2x 2.3 GHz Cortex-X4 ) Adreno 750.
  • Memory: 256 GB 12 GB RAM, 512 GB 16 GB RAM, 1 TB 16 GB RAM; UFS 4.0.
  • OS/Software: Android 14, HyperOS.
  • Rear Camera: Wide (main): 50MP, variable aperture f/1.6-f/4.0, 23mm, 1.0″ 1.6µm, multi-directional PDAF, laser autofocus, OIS; Telephoto: 50MP, f/1.8, 75mm, 1/2.51″ 0.7µm, Dual Pixel PDAF (10cm – ∞), OIS, 3.2x optical zoom; Telephoto: 50MP, f/2.5, 120mm, 1/2.51in, 0.7µm, dual-pixel PDAF (30cm – ∞), OIS, 5x optical zoom; Ultra-wide: 50MP, f/1.8, 12mm, 122˚, 1/2.51″ 0.7μm, Dual Pixel PDAF; Depth: TOF 3D.
  • Front Camera: 32MP, f/2.0, 22mm (wide), 1/3.14in, 0.7µm.
  • Video recording: Rear camera : 8K@24/30fps, 4K@24/30/60/120fps, 1080p@30/60/120/240/480/960/1920fps, gyro-EIS, Dolby Vision HDR 10-bit rec. (4K@60fps, 1080p); Front camera : 4K@30/60fps, 1080p@30/60fps, gyro-EIS.
  • Battery: 5000 mAh; Wired 90W, PD3.0, QC4, Wireless 80W, Reverse Wireless 10W.
  • Connectivity: 5G; two SIM cards; Wi-Fi 7; BT 5.4, aptX HD, aptX Adaptive, LHDC; NFC; Infrared port
  • Other specifications: fingerprint reader (under the display, optical); Stereo speakers

Read more: Xiaomi 14 review, price and specifications

Unboxing Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Not much has changed in terms of presentation, and the Xiaomi 14 Ultra comes in the usual thick black cardboard box with simple Xiaomi lettering and a red Leica logo to add some pop. The inner packaging is all made of paper, so that’s a plus.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

Its contents include a 90-watt charger (the same as last year) and a dedicated USB-A-to-C cable to accompany it. Xiaomi has also included a clear plastic back cover to protect the Ultra out of the box. It’s on the cheap side, but it’s better than nothing, plus the phone itself seems to be more durable than its predecessor.

Design, build quality, handling

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra welcomes the continuation of its appearance and is similar to the previous model in many ways, maintaining a distinct personality that sets it apart from the competition. That’s not to say there aren’t changes in style, and Xiaomi has done a few things differently when it comes to materials, but the broad lines are familiar.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra (left) next to Xiaomi 13 Ultra Xiaomi 14 Ultra (left) next to Xiaomi 13 Ultra

Most noticeable, of course, is the camera bump on the back, a circle that’s now growing even bigger than before. The device houses more or less the same hardware, so the increased diameter may well be a cosmetic improvement, although the new lenses on the telephoto and main camera may have their say.

Gone is the bump that provided a smoother transition to the camera circle, and the camera assembly is now more prominent.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe back is once again made from a synthetic leather-like material, but Xiaomi says this new nano-technology formula is six times more wear-resistant than the formula used on the old model. It certainly feels very soft and grippy – more pleasant than the 13 Ultra, although a year of use may have taken its toll, making the comparison a bit lopsided.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra (left) next to Xiaomi 13 Ultra Xiaomi 14 Ultra (left) next to Xiaomi 13 Ultra

Just like the 2023 model, and unlike any phone from other manufacturers, the 14 Ultra’s bezel flows from the sides to the back – we think this isn’t just a unique look, but should also help with durability. Xiaomi says it uses a new aluminum alloy called 6M42, which we can’t find reliable non-native information about. They claim a 1.38x improvement in strength and double the stiffness. Only this is compared to the 13 Pro and not the 13 Ultra.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewAs for materials, it should be noted that the Chinese market has a few other options besides the white (our review unit) and black aluminum/leather versions that the international model offers. We have to say that the glass back is a very attractive shade of blue, and we’d be properly annoyed if we couldn’t have it if it were ceramic – now we’re just mildly annoyed.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewAdditionally, there is another black option with a titanium (as opposed to aluminum) frame, with a gold ring around the camera in the same metallic gray color. As a result, this one is a bit more anonymous, but also potentially offers better durability. In China, this version is 13% more expensive than the basic 16GB/1TB option, which in turn is more expensive than the 16GB/512GB option available globally. So, if the Titanium version is sold globally, it will be something like 1,900 euros.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewOn the front, there are also material changes. Xiaomi has replaced the previous model’s Corning Gorilla Glass Victus with in-house Xiaomi Shield Glass, which lab tests show is 10 times more drop-resistant than the 13 Ultra. It’s hard to determine the implications of this in the real world, but if they say it’s 10x better in the lab, it must be at least somewhat better in real life.

Victus on 13 Ultra (left), Xiaomi Shield Glass on 14 Ultra Victus on 13 Ultra, Xiaomi Shield Glass on 14 Ultra

Underneath this glass is a 6.73-inch OLED screen and under it is an optical fingerprint sensor. It sits comfortably on top of the screen, so you don’t have to think twice about where it is—your thumb should naturally hit it.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewUnchanged is the IP68 rating on the Ultra, so there’s more peace of mind in inclement weather. Of course, this is consistent with the usual fine print that intrusion protection deteriorates over time, and it’s best not to deliberately test its limits in the first place.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

Photography kit

As with the 2023 model, there’s an optional dedicated set of accessories for the 14 Ultra that turns what was already a camera with a phone attached into even more of a camera. The photography kit comes in at €200, and while that sounds like a lot in isolation, that number is only 13% above the phone’s asking price, so it’s probably not that much if you appreciate it.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe kit includes a beautiful frame in black (what we got) or white (what we wished we had), with a detachable right-hand grip in the same color. Mind you, just because China has both doesn’t mean the world does.

Next are two decorative rings in different colors for the camera bump and another ring threaded for standard 67mm lens filters. The rings are now locked in place and there is a dedicated button to release them, as opposed to the lockless bayonet design of the previous version which allowed rings to be lost more easily. There is also a built-in strap that attaches to the handle for added comfort.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe case can be used without a grip, which exposes the phone’s Xiaomi logo through a slit on the back. This slot is there for practical reasons – it is used to fasten the handle to the frame. The grip has a built-in 1500 mAh battery and a USB-C port, so it adds longevity to the phone/camera combo and also allows for charging without taking it apart.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewXiaomi hasn’t just relaunched the old accessories for the new phone – they’ve added some extra functionality. In addition to the two-step shutter button (with great feel, we might add) and the zoom button surrounding it, there’s now a dial and an extra button. The dial does exposure compensation by default but can be set to control the aperture on the main camera, among other things. By default, the red dot button is used to start video recording.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewWe reiterate that an extra €200 may seem like a hefty sum to pay for a case, but the kit is more than that and adds to the utility in a number of ways – there’s the obvious photography aspect, but let’s not forget that it’s also A power bank of sorts (if relatively small). Weighing the value proposition in that will be a personal choice, of course, but if a simple “FineWoven” iPhone case (even leather) can cost €70, the Xiaomi Photo Kit is almost a bargain.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra Photography Kit - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review Xiaomi 14 Ultra Photography Kit - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review Xiaomi 14 Ultra Photography Kit - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review

Bright 6.73-inch OLED with 12-bit color and Dolby Vision

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra has a 6.73-inch OLED display with a resolution of 1440 x 3200 pixels and a 120-120Hz refresh rate – the same numbers as the 13 Ultra. It’s once again a 12-bit panel (so, theoretically, 68 billion colors) and HDR10+ and Dolby Vision are both supported.

The official specs mention both 1920Hz PWM for dimming as well as DC dimming, so the panel will probably use both methods depending on the brightness level, which apparently was the case with the previous model.

Xiaomi has promised an increase in maximum brightness (from 2,600 to 3,000 nits), and that’s the only immediate difference in specs, though it may be insignificant.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

In our testing, there was a slight increase in brightness compared to the older model when the phone was placed in bright light with adaptive brightness enabled. The 1,281 intentions we measured aren’t industry-leading, but that’s a great number nonetheless.

Xiaomi also now lets you increase the brightness by 200 nits when working with the slider – we got 710 nits with the ‘Sunlight mode’ set and 493 nits with it off. Manual result 13 Ultra).

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Refresh rate

Controlling the refresh rate on the Xiaomi 14 Ultra is relatively simple. There is the usual adaptive behavior, and when the phone is displaying static content, it drops the frequency by 10Hz (most of the time) or 1Hz (in some cases). Specific refresh rate modes will be engaged for the respective video frame rate. Games that support high frame rates will be allowed free ROM and the phone will stay in 120Hz mode for them.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

The 60Hz and 120Hz settings act as ceilings, and the adaptive behavior will still remain in place, just like the default mode (although the 120Hz mode may be a bit more aggressive in maintaining 120Hz).

Stream and HDR

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra supports HDR10+ and Dolby Vision, and we received HDR streams from Netflix and YouTube. Widevine L1 compatibility means that DRM-protected content can be played at the highest available resolution (typically 1080p).

14 Ultra and its HyperOS also support Google’s Ultra HDR standard for capturing and displaying 10-bit images from compatible phones in various applications. You’ll get your highlights in the built-in gallery as well as in Google Photos, and you can also view the effect with other compatible photos in Chrome.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra battery life

Our new Active Use Score is an estimate of how long the battery will last if the device is used with a combination of all four test activities. Using the sliders below, you can adjust the calculation based on your usage pattern. You can read about our current battery life testing method here. For a comprehensive list of all devices tested so far, head over here.

The global version of the Xiaomi 14 Ultra is equipped with a 5,000 mAh battery, which is the same battery capacity as the 13 Ultra from last year. The Chinese 14 Ultra gets a slight upgrade – to 5,300 mAh, but we don’t get that extra mAh.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

Much like the 13 Ultra, the 14 Ultra doesn’t exactly win our hearts with its endurance, though it’s a step up overall. The most significant improvement is in the gaming test, where the new model added 33% to the 13 Ultra’s impressive 5 hours – not enough to outlast the competition.

11 hours in the web browsing test is a good showing, and so is call time, but video playback life is below average. Overall, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra’s battery life isn’t class-leading, but that’s not the end either.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Charging speed

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra comes with the same 90W HyperCharge adapter that we got with the 13 Ultra. Xiaomi says the phone should be able to charge from empty to full in 33 minutes, and that was more or less our experience. Our power meter showed an instantaneous value of 78W but was happier hovering around the 75W mark, where it remained for about the first 3 minutes of the process before the power gradually decreased – as expected. went

As before, be aware that you need to enable the “Increase charging speed” switch in settings to achieve the highest possible speed – it’s disabled out of the box.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra review

Compared to the previous model, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra was slightly slower, reaching 15 minutes, but it was already half an hour ahead at the checkpoint which also made it to 100% slightly faster. We’ll admit that the 13 Pro was significantly faster than last year’s 120W charging, and a number of this year’s flagships have an edge over the 14 Ultra as well. Still, no reason to complain about the charging speed.

We also tried a non-native 65W USB Power Delivery adapter, and it got us to 50% in 30 minutes and 100% in 80 minutes – not impressive, but a decent result for those times you’ve forgotten the dedicated adapter.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra supports wireless charging, which Xiaomi rates at 80W. According to the company’s data, a full charge from flat mode should take 46 minutes with the proper dock (a brand new product launched alongside the Ultra).

We have no doubt that something close to this number is possible in real life, as their claimed wired charging speeds were far more accurate than our own measurements. That said, we couldn’t test it.

It’s worth noting that the stand doesn’t come with an adapter, and its specs say it needs a 120-watt charger to reach maximum power output. Since the phone itself comes with a 90W adapter, you should consider purchasing an additional 120W adapter to get the most out of the dock. On the other hand, even with the supplied 90W unit docked, you can probably get pretty decent speeds.

Speaker test

Xiaomi 14 Ultra uses the speaker setup of the previous model. It has one unit sticking out from the bottom, and another one at the top that sends sound up through four holes in the top plate and moves forward/up through a slot in the edge of the display glass – that’s the headphone. Is.

Bottom speaker - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Top speaker - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Phone Crack - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review
bottom speaker • top speaker • earpiece slot

The top speaker receives the left channel in the vertical direction and the channels are switched to match the horizontal direction. The two speakers each output their respective channels as well as an attenuated version of the opposite channel.

In our testing, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra matched the previous model’s “Very Good” rating for loudness, with a slightly higher numerical result. Basically, all potential competitors are in the same space in terms of loudness, although the Galaxy S24 Ultra could make a bigger impact.

The new phone improves on its predecessor with a nice sound with a slightly livelier mid-range, while maintaining good bass levels and clean treble. Neither Vivo nor Oppo are serious contenders, at least to our ears, but if we had to choose, we’d probably prefer the Galaxy.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

HyperOS on top of Android 14

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra is one of the first phones to launch with Xiaomi’s latest software platform called HyperOS – what they call a “human-centric operating system designed for the ‘Human x Car x Home’ smart ecosystem.” We’ve already come across HyperOS on the Xiaomi 14 and you can read our dedicated article or watch the video below to get a taste of it.

Xiaomi’s update policy for the 14 and 14 Ultra includes 4 years of core firmware updates, plus an additional year of security patches. While it doesn’t exactly match Google and Samsung in 7 years, it’s still a fairly strong software future.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe new OS is certainly very similar to the old MIUI, and while we’ve no doubt there are some improvements to come, long-time Xiaomi phone users will be right at home. However, there are subtle differences, such as a slightly smoother design and more rounded edges for many design elements.

HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review
HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Some things have become more intuitive, such as multi-window implementation where buttons are now more self-explanatory. This doesn’t quite apply to quick settings, so it’s nice to have an option to enable text labels (off by default). However, you can no longer opt out of Control Center – it’s only available on phones that ran pre-HyperOS, but not on phones booted with the new software.

HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review
HyperOS on Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Benchmarks

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra has Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 – the same chipset you’ll find in the Galaxy S24 Ultra, Find X7 Ultra, Magic6 Pro, or most of this year’s high-end phones, be it cameras. Central or not (vivo X100 Pro with Dimensity 9300 is a notable exception). The chip is already a familiar fixture and has proven to be a significant step up from last year’s top-end SoC from Qualcomm – as it should be.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewBuilt on the 4nm process, the SD 8 Gen 3 has an octa-core CPU in a 1+3+2+2 configuration with a Cortex-X4 main core clocked at 3.3GHz. The GPU is Adreno 750. The Xiaomi 14 Ultra for international markets comes in a configuration with 16GB of LPDDR5X RAM and 512GB of UFS 4.0 storage (this is our review unit, and the storage speed actually complies with the UFS 4.0 standard). China 14 Ultra also has 12/256GB and 16GB/1TB versions.

In the benchmarks, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra showed very good numbers – in the upper half of the class, without standing out as a flagship. It was more in its element under CPU loads, while the GPU results put it a few notches down the chart. The performance mode in the battery settings doesn’t really affect the benchmark scores in a meaningful way.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra

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Under stable load, performance mode didn’t affect the 3DMark Wild Life stress test results, and 68 percent stability isn’t half bad for a high-end phone. With this star, the initial scores were a few percentage points behind the best, but the stability is still welcome.

Stable Load, Balanced Mode: CPU Latency Test - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review Stable load, balanced mode: 3DMark Wild Life stress test - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Stable load, balanced mode: 3DMark Wild Life stress test - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Stable load, balanced mode: CPU latency test • 3DMark Wild Life stress test

In the CPU Throttling test, Performance mode had somewhat the opposite effect of what you’d expect – peak performance was lower than the default Balanced mode. However, in both cases, Xiaomi showed excellent behavior with relatively minor throttling.

Stable Loading, Performance Mode: CPU Latency Test - Xiaomi 14 Ultra Review Stable load, performance mode: 3DMark Wild Life stress test - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Stable load, performance mode: 3DMark Wild Life stress test - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Sustained load, performance mode: CPU lag test • 3DMark Wild Life stress test

Now the two telephotos focus close

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra doesn’t make major changes to the camera system – at least at first glance. Last year’s model had a lot going for it, so there wasn’t much room for improvement. However, the improvements that are there are very welcome.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe most significant overall improvement is in the close-focusing capability on the two telephoto cameras (which retain the same sensors as the previous model). The 3.2x zoom camera can now focus on objects as close as 10cm, while the periscope 5x unit’s minimum focus distance is 30cm. Sure, the same longer telephoto lens is now brighter, but f/2.5 vs. f/3.0 is harder to improve.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe lens is where one of the two changes to the main camera is visible – much easier than moving from the IMX989 to the newer LYT-900 sensor. The new optics are now brighter (f/1.63 vs. f/1.9), but the aperture can be adjusted continuously across the entire range – not just stopped down to f/4.0, which was the case on the 13 Ultra. The diaphragm uses 6 blades, but they are cut in such a way that it creates a dodecagonal shape.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewStepless adjustment is available in Pro mode, while in Normal Photo mode, you get f/1.63 wide open, f/4.0 wide stopped, and intermediate steps at f/2.0 and f/2.8.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe specifications of the ultra-wide camera remain unchanged from the previous generation, and it is still the same IMX 858 sensor in two cameras. It’s paired with an AF-capable lens at the wider end of the ultra-wide spectrum. The selfie camera isn’t much different this year, relying on a 32MP OmniVision sensor and a fixed focus lens – we’ve never been fans of it, but Xiaomi still uses it.

  • Wide (primary): 50 MP Sony LYT-900 (1″, 1.6μm – 3.2μm), f/1.63-f/4.0, 23mm, multi-directional PDAF, laser AF, OIS; 4K@120fps
  • Ultra-wide: 50 MP Sony IMX858 (1/2.51″, 0.7μm-1.4μm), f/1.8, 12mm, PDAF; 4K@60fps
  • Telephoto 1, 3.2x: 50 MP Sony IMX858 (1/2.51, 0.7μm-1.4μm), f/1.8, 75mm, PDAF (10cm – ∞), OIS; 4K@60fps
  • Telephoto 1, 5x: 50 MP Sony IMX858 (1/2.51, 0.7μm-1.4μm), f/1.8, 120mm, PDAF (30cm – ∞), OIS; 4K@60fps
  • Front camera: 32 MP OmniVision OV32B40 (1/3.14″, 0.7μm-1.4μm), f/2.0, 22mm, fixed focus; 4K@60fps

Main camera

The main camera of Xiaomi 14 Ultra takes very nice pictures as expected. The detail is excellent and rendered in a fairly natural way, with only complex textures that make the 12MP image better and look more artificial. The noise is very well controlled.

The automatic white balance was consistently accurate, and we encountered no area errors. Color saturation is well-judged, producing expressive results without overdoing it. The dynamic range is also well wide.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2932s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/3065s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2644s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2087s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2492s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2315s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/513s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/101s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 250, 1/95s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 320, 1/77s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 500, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 400, 1/51s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x)

If you want to have artificial coloring and a more cheerful look, the authentic Leica mode is the best option.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), Leica Authentic - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2723s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), Leica Authentic - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/4306s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), Leica Authentic - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2492s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), Leica Authentic - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2764s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, original camera (1x), Leica Authentic

We looked a bit at how variable aperture affects resolution. In good light, the phone usually sets it to f/2.0, which is usually a bit sharper than the f/1.63 setting, with a further stop not making much of a difference, especially with subjects closer to infinity.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/3826s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.0 - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/3020s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.8 - f/2.8, ISO 50, 1/1600s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/4.0 - f/4.0, ISO 50, 1/799s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/2214s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.0 - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/1774s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.8 - f/2.8, ISO 50, 1/940s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/4.0 - f/4.0, ISO 50, 1/442s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 • f/2.0 • f/2.8 • f/4.0

More evident is its effect on depth of field, especially with close subjects. With them, you’ll often want to stop down a bit to make sure you get more of your subject in sharp focus.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/255s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.0 - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/411s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.8 - f/2.8, ISO 50, 1/234s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/4.0 - f/4.0, ISO 50, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 - f/1.6, ISO 125, 1/101s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.0 - f/2.0, ISO 125, 1/101s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.8 - f/2.8, ISO 250, 1/101s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/4.0 - f/4.0, ISO 400, 1/66s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 - f/1.6, ISO 400, 1/68s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.0 - f/2.0, ISO 400, 1/53s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/2.8 - f/2.8, ISO 320, 1/50s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/4.0 - f/4.0, ISO 800, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x): f/1.63 • f/2.0 • f/2.8 • f/4.0

You can also check out some of our resident photo models in both portrait and portrait mode.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 80, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), photo mode - f/1.6, ISO 250, 1/83s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2455s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), photo mode - f/2.8, ISO 50, 1/267s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, main camera (1x), photo mode
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode, 23mm - f/1.6, ISO 80, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode, 23mm - f/1.6, ISO 250, 1/59s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode, 23mm - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/3349s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode, 23mm - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/1516s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode, 23mm

For completeness, here are also a handful of full-resolution examples. When viewed at 1:1, there is probably more detail, but it also has a more watercolor look to it.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/3327s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/3136s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2956s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2626s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 megapixels

The 50MP mode works best as an example on 2x zoom level samples. Xiaomi does a great job here, showing great detail even when looking at the Pixel. Still not as amazing as the vivo X100 Pro at 2X, but it’s just a notch lower and good enough.

Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2281s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 51, 1/2764s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2723s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2281s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/799s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 51, 1/2605s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 349, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/1854s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (2x)

Faces also look nicely detailed at this zoom level, especially in portrait mode. Portrait mode adds a bit more softness to the subject, but results remain good, both at 50mm and 35mm simulated focal lengths.

Daylight samples, main camera (2x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 63, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), photo mode - f/1.6, ISO 298, 1/85s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2723s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 51, 1/1609s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, main camera (2x), photo mode
Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 50mm - f/1.6, ISO 64, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 50mm - f/1.6, ISO 320, 1/79s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 50mm - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/3349s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 50mm - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/1358s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 50mm Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 35mmDaylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 35mm - f/1.6, ISO 64, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 35mm - f/1.6, ISO 320, 1/79s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 35mm - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/2889s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, main camera (2x), portrait mode, 35mm - f/1.6, ISO 50, 1/2038s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
3.2x telephoto camera

With a 3.2x zoom, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra shows a significant improvement in resolution over the previous model and is possibly the sharpest 3x image we’ve seen to date. No complaints about global parameters either – dynamic range is great, auto white balance is on point, and colors are vibrant.

Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/4306s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/6049s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/4918s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/5618s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/1244s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/5454s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/4059s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3252s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x)

It’s also great for people, whether in portrait or portrait mode.

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x), photo mode - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/148s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x), photo mode - f/1.8, ISO 250, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x), photo mode - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/6417s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x), photo mode - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/1360s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, telephoto camera (3.2x), portrait mode
Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), portrait mode, 75mm - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/140s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), portrait mode, 75mm - f/1.8, ISO 250, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), portrait mode, 75mm - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/6808s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), portrait mode, 75mm - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/1232s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), portrait mode, 75mm

But the real fun comes with the close-up. Even at minimum focus distances, the 14 Ultra’s 3.2x maintains excellent sharpness and can produce stunning results.

Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up - f/1.8, ISO 64, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/912s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/2315s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, telephoto (3.2x), close-up

This is one area where the generational difference is most apparent – ​​the 13 Ultra can’t come close to the new model’s reproduction ratio at minimum focus distance.

Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up: 14 Ultra - f/1.8, ISO 64, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up: 13 Ultra - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/157s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up: 14 Ultra - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/190s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), close-up: 13 Ultra - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/114s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, telephoto (3.2x), close-up: 14 Ultra • 13 Ultra

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra also does pretty well at 3.2x zoom when shooting at a nominal 50MP resolution, although we’re not quite sure why you’d want to do that since there’s a 5x telephoto to get things closer.

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x), 50 MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3056s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/4293s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/4107s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (3.2x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/2240s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3.2x), 50 megapixels

5x telephoto camera

The improved 5x telephoto doesn’t disappoint either, taking great shots during the day. It’s also expert at close-ups as promised, almost matching the 3x camera for reproduction while still allowing you to keep your distance from your subject.

Daylight samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1774s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/2419s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/2281s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/2384s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 125, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 125, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1827s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/423s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x)

Here, too, you can see the level of improvement compared to the old model when it comes to close-up photography.

Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), close-up: 14 Ultra - f/2.5, ISO 125, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), close-up: 13 Ultra - f/3.0, ISO 100, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), close-up: 14 Ultra - f/2.5, ISO 64, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), close-up: 13 Ultra - f/3.0, ISO 160, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, telephoto (5x), close-up: 14 Ultra • 13 Ultra

There’s no portrait mode beyond 75mm, but you can take normal shots of people at 5x.

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x), photo mode - f/2.5, ISO 64, 1/100s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x), photo mode - f/2.5, ISO 640, 1/103s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x), photo mode - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/2492s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x), photo mode - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/399s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, telephoto camera (5x), portrait mode

You can also shoot at 5x zoom at 50MP and get questionable results.

Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 50 MP - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1667s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 50 MP - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1169s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 50 MP - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1643s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 50 MP - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1240s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (5x), 50 megapixels

However, if you’re looking for more access, it’s best to push up to 10x (either from the on-screen display or better yet, use the keys on the photography kit). The images we received are very sharp, better than what the Galaxy S24 Ultra can muster. The contrast can be a bit high though.

Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 10x zoom - f/2.5, ISO 51, 1/1511s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 10x zoom - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1187s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 10x zoom - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1526s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, telephoto (5x), 10x zoom - f/2.5, ISO 50, 1/1152s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of daylight, telephoto camera (5x), zoom 10x

Ultra-wide camera

The ultra-wide camera won’t spoil the overall impression. Other than a bit more grain, there are a few flaws in its photos, and it’s rarely even noticeable enough to point out. Very good detail, great colors and dynamic range, close focus for some exaggerated landscapes – there’s a lot to like here.

Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/7439s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/7330s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3769s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/4059s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3999s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3501s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3399s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/131s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 64, 1/50s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 125, 1/49s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 160, 1/50s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 200, 1/49s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x)

You might be able to make out 50MP in ultra-wide mode, though you might have to look long and hard to find more detail.

Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x), 50 MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3147s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x), 50 MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/3290s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x), 50 MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/2715s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x), 50 MP - f/1.8, ISO 50, 1/2796s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Daylight samples, Ultra Wide Camera (0.5x), 50MP

Selfie photos

Xiaomi’s selfies are good, but not our favorite. Skin tones and colors are generally lovely, and we have no complaints about the dynamic range. But the constant insistence on selfie output with a nominal resolution of 32 megapixels is not to our liking, and the fixed focus is not up to the Ultra standard.

Selfie samples - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/125s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Selfie samples - f/2.0, ISO 80, 1/33s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Selfie samples - f/2.0, ISO 160, 1/33s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Selfie samples - f/2.0, ISO 320, 1/33s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Selfie samples - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/768s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Selfie samples - f/2.0, ISO 50, 1/2026s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Examples of selfies

Low-light photo quality

Main camera

When set to Auto, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra’s main camera takes great photos in low light. It does nice exposures that retain a lot of highlight data, while it also does a pretty good job with shadow development – ​​the Xiaomi 14 Ultra gives us brighter shadows than its direct rivals, and we say This is our preferred approach. Even in mixed lighting, automatic white balance is reliable and color rendering is easy on the eyes.

Looking closely, there’s a lot of detail, and Xiaomi strikes a good balance between preserving real information and removing noise. For example, the Galaxy S24 Ultra produces more noise but has a slight edge in detail, while the Find X7 Ultra can be a bit smoother than the Xiaomi.

Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 5000, 1/20s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 6400, 1/20s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 4000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 1000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/2.0, ISO 4000, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 4000, 1/10s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 4000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.6, ISO 3200, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low light samples, main camera (1x)

At 2x, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra’s output varies from very good in better-lit scenes to moonshine in darker settings. You’ll always have great exposure, dynamic range, and color, only darker scenes will be softer at the pixel level.

Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 5000, 1/20s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 6400, 1/20s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 4000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 1000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 4000, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.6, ISO 2500, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low light samples, main camera (2x)

3.2x telephoto camera

Even in the dark, the 3.2x telephoto will hardly leave you wanting. Exposures are on point, the dynamic range is very good, and there’s plenty of fine detail.

Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2000, 1/33s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1600, 1/8s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2000, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 800, 1/33s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1600, 1/33s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2500, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1600, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1600, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (3.2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1600, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low light samples, telephoto camera (3.2x)

5x telephoto camera

The 5x telephoto is less exciting when it comes to low-light photography. Its dynamic range is somewhat limited, and with the phone prioritizing highlights, you may often end up with darker-than-ideal photos. It also tends to make warmer light sources look orange for our liking. However, given the right amount of light, it still captures a lot of detail.

Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 1600, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 2000, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 3200, 1/6s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 2500, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 2000, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 2500, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 640, 1/50s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 3200, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 1000, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 2000, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, telephoto (5x) - f/2.5, ISO 2500, 1/25s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low light samples, telephoto camera (5x)

Ultra-wide camera

Ultra-wide offers a better display at night. Colors are a bit washed out and details are somewhat sharp when viewed up close.

Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 2500, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 3200, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 2500, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 2500, 1/13s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 2500, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 3200, 1/7s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 3200, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x) - f/1.8, ISO 3200, 1/17s - Xiaomi 14 Ultra review
Low light samples, ultra-wide camera (0.5x)

Video recording

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra can record up to 4K60 video with all its cameras – the four rear cameras and the front camera. The rear cameras can do 4K24 in addition to 4K30, and can also do 8K at 30fps and 24fps. Meanwhile, the original is also capable of 4K120.

The default codec is still h.264 for all videos except 8K recording, where you only get h.265, but you can switch to h.265 for all your videos. Dolby Vision recording is also on the menu, but only for the main 4K camera at 30 or 24 frames per second.

Video stabilization is available at all resolutions and frame rate combinations (except 4K120) and cannot be disabled in normal video mode, although there is a settings tweak that can turn it off for Director mode recording.

The video quality of the Xiaomi 14 Ultra is probably the best we have at the moment. All four rear cameras are expertly matched in appearance and have excellent dynamic range and color reproduction. 4K24 and 4K30 clips look the same from either camera and have great detail (good, more like “good” in ultrawide mode), while 60fps modes are a bit softer, but not really smooth. The 4K120fps main camera is actually the clearest main camera.

The stabilization is also excellent on the Xiaomi 14 Ultra. The main camera and ultra-wide shake make walking a gentle float, and all four cameras move smoothly and hold everything well when facing in just one direction.

At night, Xiaomi also performs well. Its main camera is roughly on par with the Galaxy S24 Ultra in terms of detail, but has a wider dynamic range, though the Find X7 Ultra might be slightly better. The ultra-wide suffers from a bit of saturation and the noise performance isn’t great. The 3.2x telephoto is significantly better than the Galaxy, but a notch below the Find X7 Ultra’s camera. When it comes to longer telephoto, the Xiaomi 5x is perhaps slightly better than the Find 6x, but the Galaxy lags behind.

Check Competitors

The Xiaomi 14 Ultra’s €1,500 price tag may mean you won’t see many of them in the wild, but it doesn’t make it difficult for us to pinpoint its competitors. Well, that, and the big circle on the back. We review the best cameras on the market with a “money ain’t nothing” attitude.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewThe most notable competitor is the Galaxy S24 Ultra, even if it doesn’t show off its camera prowess as much as many others here. The two are about equal for photos, though Xiaomi has the upper hand in video recording. Each has its own unique accessory—the S Pen versus the photography kit—and that seems to be the divisive issue. If you want a camera phone, choose Xiaomi and if you want everything, choose Galaxy.

Next on our list is the vivo X100 Pro. Also international, but nowhere near as available as the Galaxy, the vivo is still found at 20% less than the Xiaomi. Admittedly, it’s a short camera, but it’s got an amazing 2x mode and a telephoto that sits between the two Ultra cameras – maybe that 100mm focal length is your sweet spot.

Another unconventional zoom can be found on the Honor Magic6 Pro. Nominally a 2.5x camera, its 180MP sensor (or 200MP, depending on how you look at it) can easily be stretched to 5x, though the Xiaomi will still be relatively comfortable beyond that, and the Ultra is an easy option to capture. The video is here.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra (left) next to Oppo Find X7 Ultra Xiaomi 14 Ultra (left) next to Oppo Find X7 Ultra

This next one is more of a wild card and official availability is limited to China. But if you could live with the software features it derives from, you might be able to entertain the idea of ​​a gray import. The thing is, after seeing the Xiaomi 14 Ultra in action, we consider the X7 Ultra to be the best, and we’re less inclined to buy one.

There is a more exotic option that can be mentioned in passing. The iPhone 15 Pro Max costs about the same as the Xiaomi and will be great for video too, while offering superior selfies and best-in-class battery life. Since it’s an iPhone, it will also have a choice of accessories for any photo or video use case, which probably negates the benefits of Xiaomi’s kit. However, it remains an iPhone and doesn’t simply jump between ecosystems on a whim.

Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra vivo X100 Pro Honor Magic6 Pro Oppo Find X7 Ultra Apple iPhone 15 Pro Max
Galaxy S24 Ultra • vivo X100 Pro • Honor Magic6 Pro • Oppo Find X7 Ultra • iPhone 15 Pro Max

Summary

We pretty much knew what to expect from the Xiaomi 14 Ultra. For example, price has always been a deterrent, and Xiaomi’s approach to selfies hasn’t been to our taste for a while now. We could even predict subpar endurance and drop out of the 13 Ultra results.

Xiaomi 14 Ultra reviewWe could also predict its strengths with sufficient confidence. A camera favorite in the office, the 13 Ultra doesn’t leave much to be desired, yet Xiaomi has found a few areas to touch up on the 14. Close-focus telephotos have become the latest trend, and these two are here. It’s probably the best at it, but it’s also great from a distance. The variable aperture on the main camera is also welcome if you want a lot of control over DoF, although we don’t see it as an entirely revolutionary development.

The unique selling point of Xiaomi 14 Ultra is the photography kit. Realizing its appeal and potential to boost Ultra sales, Xiaomi has continued to develop the device and add features to it. Indeed, it adds more cost to an expensive phone, but the two together bring you as close to a “real” camera in terms of ergonomics and experience as a smartphone can get.

In the end, the Xiaomi 14 Ultra is probably the best camera phone you can buy today.

Why should we buy Xiaomi 14 Ultra?

  • Absolutely perfect camera system, almost flawless.
  • Especially great video recording.
  • First-class performance under sustained load.
  • Unique accessories package (if optional and not exactly cheap).

Why should we avoid buying  Xiaomi 14 Ultra?

  • Expensive, even for what it is, with little hope for discounts down the line.
  • Battery life is below average.
  • The selfie camera takes average-quality photos, lacks autofocus

Source: GSMARENA.COM

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Technology

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review, technical specifications

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Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Review of Motorola Edge 50 Pro phone, price, technical specifications, design, screen, software, hardware, battery life and charging, and other specifications of this phone.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review, technical specifications

Introduction

Motorola has been sensual about experiences this year, shifting the focus from specs to lifestyle – or at least that’s the idea they’re trying to sell the Edge 50 Pro with. Colors, materials, experiences and AI are where the marketing focus is, but we try to remain pragmatic.

You can’t miss Pantone’s collaboration on the outside—like the company’s previous models, the Edge 50 Pro comes in at least one unusual color, approved by color-matching experts. In this article we are talking about lavender blue. But it’s been done before, and now there’s more Pantone – the display and camera are also Pantone accredited, both industry firsts (for whatever that’s worth).

More to our liking are the numbers, and the 6.7-inch OLED is both sharp (1220p) and snappy (144Hz), though Motorola says it lacks brightness (2000 nits). On the camera front, there are a number of specs to appreciate as well – first of all, the f/1.4 aperture on the main camera. It’s also commendable to see the triple-camera setup, along with the telephoto, and the fact that the ultra-wide camera has autofocus right off the bat.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

We’re less keen on the heart of the Edge 50 Pro, Snapdragon 7 Gen 3. You may remember that last year’s Edge 40 Pro was the Snapdragon flagship, but this year’s Pro is different – ​​meaning a 2024 lineup shakeup. There’s an Ultra at the top, like a generation ago, and that one gets the top-end chipset. The Pro, meanwhile, is relegated to a more mid-range status – we’ll see where it sits on the scale as we go along.

Charging capability is almost as flagship, though – at 125W and 18 minutes from empty to full, the specs are over-promising – albeit with some caveats. The 50W wireless charging rating is also a welcome improvement over the previous generation’s 15W, even if the 4,500mAh capacity isn’t very generous. We like the relatively compact size and pocket-friendly weight, and the IP68 rating is very welcome (also, befitting the “Pro” name).

Specifications of Motorola Edge 50 Pro at a glance:

  • Body:  161.2×72.4×8.2mm, 186g; glass front, silicon polymer (eco leather) or acetate back, aluminum frame; IP68 dust/water resistant (up to 1.5m for 30 minutes).
  • Display:  6.7-inch P-OLED, 1B color, 144 Hz, HDR10+, 2000 nits (peak), resolution 1220 x 2712 pixels, aspect ratio 20:9, 446ppi.
  • Chipset:  Qualcomm Snapdragon 7 Gen 3 (4nm): Octa-core (1×2.63 GHz Cortex-A715 & 4×2.4 GHz Cortex-A715 & 3×1.8 GHz Cortex-A510); Adreno 720.
  • Memory:  128GB 8GB RAM, 256GB 8GB RAM, 256GB 12GB RAM, 512GB 12GB RAM; UFS 2.2.
  • OS/Software:  Android 14, Hello UI.
  • Rear camera:  Wide (main)  : 50 MP, f/1.4, 25 mm, 1/1.55 ​​inch, 1.0 µm, multi-directional PDAF, laser autofocus, OIS;  Telephoto  : 10MP, f/2.0, 67mm, 1.0μm, PDAF, OIS, 3x optical zoom  :  13MP, f/2.2, 120˚, 16mm, 1.12μm, AF.
  • Front camera:  50 MP, f/1.9, 21 mm, 0.64 µm, AF.
  • Videography:  Rear camera  : 4K@30fps, 1080p@30/60/120/240fps, 10-bit HDR10+, gyro-EIS.  Front camera  : 4K@30fps, 1080p@30/60fps.
  • Battery:  4500mAh; 125W wired, 100% in 18 minutes (advertised), 50W wireless, 10W reverse wireless.
  • Connectivity:  5G; two SIM cards; Wi-Fi 6e; BT 5.4; NFC.
  • Other specifications:  fingerprint reader (under the display, optical); stereo speakers; Ready to support 6.

Unboxing Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Unboxing a Motorola has become somewhat of a pleasure in recent years thanks to the use of fragrance inside the box – certainly a unique sensory experience you won’t get from other brands. We’ll be quick to admit that there are few practical advantages to this, but that doesn’t mean we like it any less. This is in addition to the fact that the packaging is plastic-free and made from 80% recycled materials, which is always good.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

Inside, in addition to the phone, you’ll also get a TurboPower adapter. Its maximum output will be different depending on the region and/or phone version. Our Euro-spec 12/512GB includes a 125W charger, which is what the 12/256GB option will also get, but the 8GB/128GB and 8GB/256GB variants come with a 68W unit (at least to the best how we can say) will be accompanied. – worth double-checking with your dealer). A USB-C cable is also included.

Also part of the package is a sturdy back cover with a semi-transparent matte effect. The color of the accessory matches the color of the phone, and for our lavender blue review unit, it’s called Heron Blue (talk again in Pantone).

Design, build quality, handling

The sensory experience continues even after unboxing. A well-fitting back panel, along with curved front and rear edges, make the Edge 50 Pro a pleasure to hold – an impression that’s also reinforced by the phone’s very reasonable size and weight.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

In our Lavender Blue colorway, as well as the Black Beauty variant (both Pantone-approved names, of course), the back panel is made of leather-like plastic or silicone vegan leather. It’s one of the smoothest implementations we’ve come across and actually offers a very good grip while keeping fingerprints at bay. There’s a third option called Moonlight Pearl, which has a matte acetate panel – each of these has a unique texture on the back.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro colorways - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Motorola Edge 50 Pro colorways - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Motorola Edge 50 Pro colorways - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Motorola Edge 50 Pro colors

The panel slopes gently towards the camera island, where the lenses stick out a bit more. For example, if you place the phone on a flat surface and start typing on it, the island is tilted to the side, causing the phone to shake. Also, the edges of the panel are slightly scratched where they meet the frame. Both are little more than minor annoyances, though, and probably only exist in the minds of reviewers.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

The frame of this car is made of aluminum and has a matte coating that matches the back panel. The physical controls are on the right side, and the power button and volume rocker are metal and click well.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

With a leather or acetate finish, the Edge 50 Pro is IP68 rated for dust and water resistance – it should survive 1.5m of water for up to 30 minutes (in case of an accident, of course – we don’t encourage you to do that). Go ahead and submerge your phones in water). Meanwhile, the display side is protected by some form of Gorilla Glass, but Motorola hasn’t revealed the exact version.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

Edge 50 Pro has an optical fingerprint sensor under the display. We had no issues with its performance in terms of speed or reliability, although we would have appreciated a higher placement.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

144Hz Curved Edge OLED

The Edge 50 Pro is equipped with a 6.7-inch screen that leaves nothing to be desired – at least for this class. The OLED panel has a maximum refresh rate of 144Hz, so, as we’ve come to expect from Motorola, it’s once again a notch higher than 120Hz – though it’s not LTPO, so it won’t be quite as consistent in its refresh rate. Resolution switching is also higher than “normal” at 1220 x 2712 pixels, which makes the pixel density of 446ppi very clear.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

The display has a combination of DC dimming and PWM at a relatively high 720 Hz and has a Flicker Prevention mode for those who are particularly sensitive to this phenomenon. It’s a 10-bit panel with HDR10+ video support and a specified maximum brightness of 2000 nits.

In our brightness test, the Edge 50 Pro was good for just under 1,300 nits in adaptive mode when placed in bright light – a significant improvement over previous-generation models and one of the highest numbers in its class today. It’s not that keen on letting you manually raise the nits, only allowing up to 516 nits at the top end of the slider.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola touts a lot about how the Edge 50 Pro’s display is both Pantone and Pantone SkinTone certified, meaning it’s been certified by people who specialize in color accuracy to depict colors and skin tones. It is considered accurate. We’re not entirely sure how important it is, but we think it wouldn’t hurt.

Refresh rate

The Edge 50 Pro offers multiple refresh rate modes with some adaptive behavior in all but the 60Hz mode. Auto mode goes up to 120Hz and idle goes down to 60Hz and so does 120Hz mode.

144Hz mode enables the maximum supported refresh rate, but it also switches to 60Hz when you don’t touch the screen.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

When games are set to “System Follow” settings they seem to be limited to 60Hz on auto mode. You can set a higher refresh rate for each game, or choose one of the higher global settings from the screen settings menu before playing the game – auto mode isn’t suitable for gaming.

Stream and HDR

The Edge 50 Pro isn’t Dolby Vision certified – the 40 Pro is, but this year’s lineup is segmented differently, so that’s not a downgrade. The phone is still compatible with HDR10 and HDR10+ videos, and you can get HDR streams from YouTube. The implementation is such that the display only goes into HDR mode when you switch the video to full-screen playback and does not enable it for in-app previews or picture-in-picture mode.

Netflix doesn’t allow HDR playback on the Edge 50 Pro, just like it did when we reviewed it on the 40 Neo. The Widevine L1 certification enables FullHD playback, so at least that’s possible.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro battery life

Our new Active Use Score is an estimate of how long the battery will last if the device is used with a combination of all four test activities. Using the sliders below, you can adjust the calculation based on your usage pattern.

The Edge 50 Pro is powered by a 4500 mAh battery – a reasonable capacity considering the rest of the hardware. In our active usage test, we clocked in at 10:10 hours on the web browsing script and 15:27 hours on video playback. The result of the game was a constant 7 hours, while the contact time reached 33:28 hours.

Those aren’t bad numbers, but they’re not particularly impressive either, although it’s important what you compare them to. Depending on your region and where the local market places the Edge 50 Pro, you could be looking at the Galaxy S23 or Pixel 8, and the Edge 50 Pro has a slight advantage over them. Then again, the OnePlus 12R will give you better longevity at a similar price. In other situations, however, where the Edge 50 Pro goes up against more affordable mid-range rivals, the comparison won’t do it any favors.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro
Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Charging speed

Our Motorola Edge 50 Pro arrived with a 125W TurboPower adapter, a unit that, according to the promotional materials, should be able to get you from a dead battery to 100% in 18 minutes. This was indeed the case in our testing, making it easily the best in class and the phone’s main selling point in our book.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewNote, the “charge boost” switch must be enabled to get these numbers for you, and out of the box it is disabled. Not that the required 28 minutes is a bad result, but if you’re in “faster faster” mode, make sure you find the key.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

The good news does not end there. The Edge 50 Pro also supports wireless charging, and Motorola rates it with a dedicated 50W charging dock. We don’t have test results for that, but given the Pixel 8’s rating for 18W and the Galaxy’s max out at 15W, we can’t imagine the Moto losing that race. Not to mention the rest of its potential competitors that don’t have wireless charging in the first place.

Speaker test

The Edge 50 Pro has a stereo speaker setup with a main unit on the bottom and another on top that doubles as a handset for voice calls. Each speaker plays only its own channel track, and the phone dynamically allocates channels depending on its orientation in space.

Bottom speaker - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Top Speaker / Earpiece - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review Dolby Atmos badge - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Bottom speaker • Top speaker / Headphone • Dolby Atmos badge

In our speaker testing, the Edge 50 Pro scored “Very Good” for loudness, which is a notch lower than last year’s Pro and on par with the 40 and 40 Neo, though the names don’t quite mean what they once did. The 50 Pro sounded significantly better to our ears than either of the Edge 40s, offering lower-end presence and a more balanced response in the higher frequency range. It’s also superior to the OnePlus 12R or vivo V30, although the Pixel 8 and Galaxy S23 offer compelling alternatives for speaker sound quality.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Android 14, enhanced by Hello UI

The Motorola Edge 50 Pro runs Android 14 with Motorola’s in-house customizations, now called Hello UI (“Hello, Moto!”). The company promises 3 OS updates and 4 years of security patches (which we’re told are delivered quarterly).

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewThis is our first encounter with Moto running Android 14, and also our first encounter with Hello branding. We’ve said many times that Motorola’s software looks a lot like AOSP with some built-in features and tweaks, and that’s largely true.

Even so, something as simple as a font can add a lot of personality, and Motorola has done it expertly. If you’re looking for personalization, the option of AI-generated wallpaper is also on the table, because AI is everything – Motorola calls it Style sync, and the idea is to have wallpaper that matches your outfit of the day.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewCustomizations are in the usual Moto app hub, which has been reshaped for this iteration. Things are now organized more neatly, with categories that have many entries, such as gestures, putting items on the same page without having to scroll.

Moto App - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review Moto App - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review Moto App - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review
Moto app

Speaking of which, the info page for each gesture now has a better visual explanation of how the gesture works. Motorola went so far as to match the animation to the actual color of the phone – or is it just lavender blue on all units as the hero color?

More Moto App - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review More Moto App - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review More Moto App - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review
More Moto app

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewSome old Motorola features can also be found in the Edge 50 Pro. Ready For functionality is now split into Ready For (for connecting to a PC or tablet) and Moto Connect (for connecting to standalone displays, either wired or wireless). The phone screen can act as a trackpad, or the entire phone can act as an air mouse. Both Ready For and Moto Connect can be launched via a quick swipe in the notification area or from their app icons in the app drawer.

Ready for - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Moto Connect Review - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Moto Connect Review - Motorola Edge 50 Pro
Ready for • Moto Connect

Moto Unplugged and Family Space are two features that limit access to apps and features for one of two reasons: on the one hand, to keep you calm or focused, or to limit the use of the child’s phone.

Moto Unplugged Review - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Moto Unplugged Review - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Family Space - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Moto Unplugged • Moto Unplugged • Family Space

Benchmarks

The Edge 50 Pro relies on the Snapdragon 7 Gen 3 for its computing, and compared to the Edge 40 Pro, that’s a +1 in the generation, but a -1 in the series. This makes the new model a mid-range model in terms of raw performance – which makes sense given that there’s an Ultra this time around, but it still doesn’t help the Pro’s case against its rivals.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewThis doesn’t necessarily mean that the 7 Gen 3 SoC is bad. While its position in Qualcomm’s lineup is a bit odd (slightly more powerful than the 7s Gen 2, nowhere near as powerful as the 7+ Gen 2), it’s still an up-to-date 4nm chip. It has an octa-core processor in 1+4+3 configuration (1×2.63GHz A715 4×2.4GHz A715 and 3×1.8GHz A510) and Adreno 720 GPU.

Memory options start at 8GB/128GB, and there are 8GB/256GB and 12GB/256GB variants, while our review unit is the top-spec 12GB/512GB. Not all storage levels will be available in all markets.

Motorola lists the storage type as UFS 2.2, but our review unit’s write speed is more in line with UFS 3.1 for some reason.

Looking at the benchmark results, the Edge 50 Pro is not always in a favorable position. The leading competitors that can be had in some markets for the money of the Edge 50 Pro are out of reach in all benchmarks.

In other markets, where Moto competes with mid-rangers, it’s a bit more subtle. For example, the Vivo V30 is almost equal, while the Edge 50 Pro has the upper hand in the GPU department over the Galaxy A55 and Realme 12 Pro+.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

Motorola Edge 50 Pro

One area where having a mid-range chipset usually helps is stable behavior under load. In fact, the Edge 50 Pro achieved excellent results in both of our usual stress tests. We saw minimal strain in our 1-hour CPU test and no performance degradation in our 20-minute GPU run. This is more or less what we got from the vivo V30 as well.

CPU throttling test - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review 3DMark Wild Life Stress Test - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review 3DMark Wild Life Stress Test - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review
CPU throttling test • 3DMark Wild Life stress test

Related article: Motorola Razr 40 review, price and specifications

Good triple camera

The Pro may not be the Ultra, but it still has the full camera setup. Headlining is the 50-megapixel primary camera, albeit mostly thanks to the ultra-wide f/1.4 aperture. But it’s nice to see telephoto cameras on non-flagship phones too, the 3x zoom unit is very welcome here. Also a welcome sight is the ultra-wide autofocus, another hallmark on the Edge 50 Pro’s spec sheet.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

Another important selling point, looking at the hardware alone, is the selfie camera. Not only does it use a large sensor, but it also has a wide-angle lens with autofocus. It can also record 4K videos. It’s the same selfie camera you’ll find on the Edge 50 Ultra, so if selfies are your main priority, the Pro should probably be good enough.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro review

In the AI ​​this, AI that department, the Edge 50 Pro promises video stabilization, advanced long exposure processing, and overall dynamic range and detail enhancement magic.

Also, for the first time, there are settings in the viewfinder that allow you to take photos and directly apply Google Photos “enhancement” processing. If you find yourself doing this often with your photos after they’re displayed in the gallery, this can save you a step. However, there is no obvious way to get the pre-enhanced photo after saving the auto-enhanced version. We prefer to take the “natural” and enhance it when needed.

  • Wide (main):  50 MP OmniVision  OV50E  (1/1.55″, 1.0μm – 2.0μm), f/1.4, 25mm, multi-directional PDAF, laser AF, OIS; 4K@30fps
  • Ultra-wide:  13MP SK Hynix  HI1336  (1/3.0, 1.12µm), f/2.2, 16mm, PDAF; 4K@30fps
  • Telephoto:  10MP Samsung  S5K3K1  (1/3.94, 1.0µm), f/2.0, 67mm, PDAF, OIS; 4K@30fps
  • Front camera:  50MP Samsung  JNS  (probably JN1 variant, 1/2.76″, 0.64µm-1.28µm), f/1.9, 21mm, PDAF; 4K@30fps

Day photo quality

Main camera

Daylight shots from the main Moto camera are steady. They have plenty of contrast (perhaps a touch too much, even) and expressive (but not overly so) color rendition, which makes for a lovely overall tonal reproduction, especially in outdoor shots. Detail is pretty good, unless you stare too long at the grass, which can look a bit artificial.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1882s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/1800s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1464s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/2384s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1190s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/2214s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1748s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/710s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/968s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1105s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 416, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 386, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 206, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 200, 1/159s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 400, 1/87s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x)

Motorola hosted a special press event in Morocco where we brought our Edge 50 Pro review for additional samples in addition to samples from our usual locations. Here is a selection of the main cameras and you will be on this page of other cameras.

More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 380, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/423s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/411s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/214s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 325, 1/60s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 156, 1/200s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 1163, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review More examples in daylight, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/775s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
More examples in daylight, main camera (1x)

The minimum focus distance of this camera is not very long, but thanks to its excellent aperture, you can capture small objects well at short distances with blurred backgrounds.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/968s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/886s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1623s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/649s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 400, 1/85s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 200, 1/113s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x)

Here are some people’s photos to show you how the phone handles skin tones. These are Pantone approved skin tones, please note.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 425, 1/75s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 127, 1/240s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/594s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 102, 1/4435s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of daylight, main camera (1x), photo mode
Daylight samples, main camera (24mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 400, 1/71s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (24mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 109, 1/200s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (24mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/603s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (24mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/4636s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (24mm), portrait mode

There’s also a portrait mode zoom setting that mimics the lens’ 35mm field of view.

Daylight samples, main camera (35mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 456, 1/91s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (35mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 171, 1/351s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (35mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/710s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (35mm), portrait mode - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/4501s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of daylight, main camera (35mm), portrait mode

Full resolution mode can offer a slight improvement in detail, though it’s not really a significant advantage, it comes at the cost of a narrower dynamic range.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/2601s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/2719s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/2147s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/3877s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1936 - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/3152s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 102, 1/2842s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 MP - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1120s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50 megapixels

A 2x button is conveniently located in the viewfinder, and we read the results well. They’re not the sharpest images, but if you limit your viewing to phone screens or screen-fit levels on a PC, you should be fine. To be fair, you might be better off shooting at 50MP and cropping the center to match the 2x field of view.

Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/1697s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/997s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/3399s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/2529s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/835s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/2281s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 101, 1/2087s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 750, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, main camera (2x)

Telephoto camera (3x)

Telephoto camera results are also good. Details are appropriate and naturally presented. The dynamic range is wide and the colors are lovely if not quite the same as the original camera.

Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/1320s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/799s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/1122s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/1400s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 105, 1/402s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/2118s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/1340s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 1632, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/436s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/164s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/109s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 981, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3x)

The zoom camera is also perfectly adequate as a close-up photographer, although if you get too close, the phone will quickly switch to a zoomed-in view of the main camera. Either be careful to cross the focus threshold near telephoto, or resort to Pro mode, where there is no automatic camera switching.

Daylight samples, telephoto (3x), close-up - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/449s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x), close-up - f/2.0, ISO 197, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x), close-up - f/2.0, ISO 1009, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x), close-up - f/2.0, ISO 216, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of daylight, telephoto (3x), close-up

We admit that Pantone-approved skin tones look good. 85mm portrait mode shots come from the telephoto camera with some digital zoom, and you can tell by the relative softness.

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 1200, 1/82s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/112s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto camera (3x), photo mode - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/376s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (3x), portrait mode - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/2455s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of daylight, telephoto camera (3x), portrait mode
Daylight samples, telephoto (85mm), portrait mode - f/2.0, ISO 1009, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (85mm), portrait mode - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/112s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (85mm), portrait mode - f/2.0, ISO 138, 1/496s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, telephoto (85mm), portrait mode - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/2492s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of daylight, telephoto camera (85mm), portrait mode

Ultra-wide camera

Ultra-wide also does not destroy the positive impression. In fact, it performs excellently in its field, delivering crisp results with a wide dynamic range and pleasing colors. Its autofocus capability is also much appreciated, allowing you to capture close-up objects with exaggerated perspectives or some distorted close-ups.

Daylight Samples, Ultra Wide Camera - f/2.2, ISO 101, 1/1854s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/1156s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/1360s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 101, 1/1672s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight Samples, Ultra Wide Camera - f/2.2, ISO 101, 1/1827s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/1464s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/1486s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/185s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 485, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 166, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight Samples, Ultra Wide Camera - f/2.2, ISO 200, 1/98s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro Review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 406, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/603s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 154, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/211s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Daylight samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 100, 1/659s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of daylight, ultra-wide camera

Selfie photos

Selfies are excellent on the Edge 50 Pro. The detail is excellent, the dynamic range is nice and wide, and skin tones are pleasingly lifelike, although a touch of extra saturation wouldn’t hurt colors overall.

Selfie samples - f/1.9, ISO 173, 1/100s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Selfie samples - f/1.9, ISO 609, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Selfie samples - f/1.9, ISO 1025, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Selfie samples - f/1.9, ISO 1072, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Selfie samples - f/1.9, ISO 100, 1/679s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Selfie samples - f/1.9, ISO 116, 1/200s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Examples of selfies

Low-light photo quality

Main camera

The main camera of the Edge 50 Pro takes very good photos in low light in the default photo mode. Exposures look balanced and natural, and you can get a fairly wide dynamic range without overexposed shadows. The colors are excellent in terms of both white balance and saturation. The detail is also good, but has a somewhat processed quality.

Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 1719, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 2725, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 4494, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 2244, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 2456, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 1963, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 2350, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 4238, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 2975, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 3200, 1/23s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 5863, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 1994, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 1744, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 1000, 1/34s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 4363, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.4, ISO 2844, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low light samples, main camera (1x)

The Drag 50 Pro’s night mode does try harder to preserve highlights, though not as much in terms of shadow development.

Low-light samples, main camera (1x), night mode - f/1.4, ISO 1419, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x), night mode - f/1.4, ISO 1894, 1/17s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x), night mode - f/1.4, ISO 2569, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (1x), night mode - f/1.4, ISO 1769, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low light samples, main camera (1x), night mode

At 2x, details are even sharper, making pixel-level checking less of a pleasant task.

Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 1669, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 2181, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 3763, 1/20s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 2806, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 2088, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 2056, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 1600, 1/32s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, main camera (2x) - f/1.4, ISO 1506, 1/25s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low light samples, main camera (2x)

Telephoto camera

The telephoto camera of this phone also performs admirably in the dark. Sharpness and detail are excellent, dynamic range and tonal development are excellent even in difficult high-contrast scenes, and colors are generally on point.

Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 4592, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 5488, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 5536, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 5488, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 3664, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 5408, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 4880, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 2544, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 1225, 1/50s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 3840, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 2432, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 2320, 1/33s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 4304, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 6240, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 2400, 1/35s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, telephoto (3x) - f/2.0, ISO 6816, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low light samples, telephoto camera (3x)

Ultra-wide camera

Ultrawide is not half bad either. Pixel-level detail can be a little soft in the shadows, but no more so than competing efforts and better-lit scenes actually render well. Colors and dynamic range are also generally pretty good, though Night mode still retains a bit of a highlight.

Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 2816, 1/17s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3344, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 5792, 1/10s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3232, 1/15s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3152, 1/14s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3248, 1/13s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3280, 1/17s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 2400, 1/17s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3184, 1/17s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 3200, 1/12s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 1600, 1/18s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review Low-light samples, ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 1475, 1/17s - Motorola Edge 50 Pro review
Low light samples, ultra-wide camera

Video recording

The Edge 50 Pro can record up to 4K30 on all its cameras – the three rear cameras and the selfie camera. All but ultrawide can do 1080p at 60fps in addition to the usual 30fps.

The default codec is h.264, but you can select h.265 by turning the switch in the settings. Stabilization is available in all modes and can be turned off if you have an alternative means of holding the photo still.

However, we’re not too keen on the Edge 50 Pro’s video quality. Its 4K clips are very high contrast, especially on the main and ultra-wide cameras. Detail is kind of soft on the ultra-wide camera, over-processed on the main camera, and probably only the telephoto gets a higher score. White balance varies between the three, with the primary camera being the most accurate and the other two cameras each off in their own way. Also, neither camera was able to maintain a consistent 30fps frame rate, instead hovering around the 27fps mark.

In low light, the main camera performs well on most metrics, capturing good detail and decent dynamic range, while maintaining color saturation. The other two are on the soft side of the spectrum.

Stabilization is mostly very good, although there were some small imperfections in our experience. Both the main and ultra-wide cameras stabilize walking shake well. The ultra-wide showed little tendency to hunt for focus when walking. All three started the pans smoothly, but we found that dropped frames in the middle of the pan ruined the harvest. Just pointing the phone in one direction produces stable footage – not quite shake-free, but good enough.

Check Competitors

As we mentioned many times during the review, the Motorola Edge 50 Pro is positioned differently in different markets. Its €700 price tag in Europe, at least at launch, puts it up against a few old (or vintage?) flagships, while what we’d call the mid-range ones sell for lower rates. In India, on the other hand, the Moto is much more competitively priced, while decent high-end phones, even last year’s models, command higher prices.

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewLet’s say you have 700 euros to buy an Edge 50 Pro in Europe. The Galaxy S23 is the same size at 256GB, giving you a high-end (if last year) chipset in a really compact package. The Galaxy will have the upper hand when it comes to video, though camera performance outside of that is roughly comparable to excellent selfies. Similarly, the Galaxy DeX is a good match for Moto’s Ready For and Moto Connect functionality, and the two phones have similar battery life. Although the Moto charges significantly faster.

The Pixel 8 is another flagship device for the Edge 50 Pro. Much like the Galaxy, its advantage over the Moto is a higher-end chipset and better video quality, and if you like the Edge 50 Pro for its Pixel-like software, how about some real Pixel software? The Moto has a telephoto camera, so it gets extra points if you’re into zooming, and once again its charging speed is a significant advantage over the Pixel.

OnePlus has a tradition of not so much flagships, and the 12R is exactly that. It’s the third potential competitor with more computing power than the Moto, but it’s also the first to compete in charging speed, not to mention an advantage in longevity. Edge 50 Pro is the best camera – has telephoto, better ultra-wide, and better selfie, but it is not great for video. Additionally, the Edge has tighter seals (IP68 vs. IP64), and we like Moto’s software better.

Samsung Galaxy S23 Google Pixel 8 OnePlus 12R
Samsung Galaxy S23 • Google Pixel 8 • OnePlus 12R

OnePlus, though slightly more expensive than Moto in India, is still a decent option with all the pros and cons mentioned earlier.

You could also consider the Galaxy A55, although that phone is also slightly more expensive than the Edge 50 Pro – at least for now. Samsung wins for battery life but naturally loses for charging speed. It’s more of a tie in the performance department than any previous era, with the Moto actually having a distinct GPU advantage. Add its superior camera system to the mix and the Edge has a distinct multimedia edge.

The vivo V30 is also priced in the Moto ballpark. A key selling point for the V30 is battery life – it has a significant advantage in our testing, and it’s not too bad at charging either, even if it can’t reach the speeds of the Edge 50 Pro. While the Moto is generally better at taking pictures and doesn’t have a telephoto camera (none on the vivo), the V30 has a better ultra-wide camera that could be a bargain for your budget buyer. Although vivo is not too water resistant (IP54).

Realme 12 Pro+ is one of the models that aspires to have a strong camera in the middle of the range. With the main camera being more of a compromise between the two, the Realme manages to impress you with its excellent zoom (3x high-res periscope), though it doesn’t quite match the Moto at the ultra-wide end, and the Edge wins for selfies. to be

Samsung Galaxy A55 Vivo V30 Realme 12 Pro+
Samsung Galaxy A55 • vivo V30 • Realme 12 Pro+

Summary

The Pro isn’t the top model in the Motorola Edge series this time around, but it sits well below flagship territory. Even with the ultra-spec Ultra, the Edge 50 Pro still manages to deliver a very capable camera setup for photos – a main camera light-gathering champ combined with a solid telephoto in a segment where dedicated zoom cameras are rare. An ultra-wide that has autofocus and uses it well. And then tops it all off with some great selfies for good measure.

However, it doesn’t quite tickle our fancy for video recording, so it’s worth bearing in mind that it’s not quite the all-rounder it could be. Also somewhat annoying is the choice of chipset, which may be sufficient for many things, but still doesn’t look good next to similarly priced rivals in some markets. The 125W/68W charger situation could even be spun as a good thing, if the smaller unit really helps keep the price down for lower-spec versions of the phone, though we’d keep it as a problem, due to the extra explanation it provides. we do. I had to do it

Motorola Edge 50 Pro reviewThere’s a lot to like about the Edge 50 Pro, and yes, part of that is the 125W super-fast charging that’s hard to compete with, although we don’t imagine the 68W option will be too hard to live with either. The display is better than the others on most measures and it also has Pantone credentials – an industry first and a masterpiece that’s bound to attract droves of buyers (or so the marketing team thinks). The case back color also comes from that company’s catalog and is certainly good, but we’d be just as happy with a generic name color as long as it sticks and maintains water resistance – something that’s not yet available globally. , even for Edge 50 Pro money.

Motorola says it’s pretty good in terms of experience and beyond spec wars, which is a relief when the chipset isn’t winning. But the newly renamed Hello UI is a significant part of the experience with the Edge 50 Pro, a beautiful blend of the visual simplicity of stock Android and the personality and functionality that Motorola built and continues to build on top of.

All things considered, the Motorola Edge 50 Pro is worth just one recommendation – with an average star for its regional price and market context.

Why should we buy Motorola Edge 50 Pro?

  • Light and compact body, sticky back, interesting color options; IP68 dust and water resistant.
  • Great screen – bright, clear, 144Hz.
  • Class-leading charging speed (with 125W adapter), it also has wireless charging.
  • Really nice software package – looks ‘stock’, lots of useful features added.
  • In general, excellent photo quality from all cameras in all conditions.
  • First-class selfies.

Why should we avoid byuing Motorola Edge 50 Pro?

  • Low power chipset compared to the price.
  • The video quality is not quite high.
  • The included charger depends on the memory version.

Resource: GSMARENA.COM

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Technology

Galaxy Fit 3 review

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Galaxy Fit 3
The Galaxy Fit 3 is a great generational improvement and benefits from many features of the Galaxy Watch, making it an attractive choice for users on a tighter budget.

Galaxy Fit 3 review

It has been four years since Samsung released the third generation Galaxy Fit smart band; In this long absence, many probably forgot that Samsung also has a smart wristband in addition to a smartwatch, and for a while, it was even rumored that the Koreans have abandoned the Galaxy Fit product line forever.

Galaxy Fit 3, which was launched at the end of February 2024, has changed its face so much that it can hardly be considered the sequel of the previous generation; From the 31% increase in screen size, which has changed the previous very elongated form factor to more reasonable dimensions, to the two-piece strap and aluminum material of the body instead of plastic, and the addition of fall detection capabilities and ambient light sensor.

If you have had a Galaxy Fit 2 and want to stay in the Samsung ecosystem at a much higher cost than Chinese smart bands, you will not regret buying the Galaxy Fit 3; But I don’t think many people are going to upgrade now. You probably either want to know which one to choose for your first smartwatch, between the Fit 3 and the Xiaomi Smart Band 8, or you want to know if you can spend more than half the price of the Galaxy Watch 6 and get all the features and functions that make this watch one of the best. Has the market smartwatch become accessible or not?

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 specifications at a glance

Display

1.6 inch AMOLED with a resolution of 256 x 402 pixels

Weight

36.8 grams (with strap) / 18.5 grams (without strap)

Dimensions

42.9 x 28.8 x 9.9 mm

body

Aluminum (in black, white and rose gold)

operating system

FreeRTOS

Sensors

Optical heart rate sensor with the ability to calculate the blood oxygen level (SpO2), accelerometer, gyroscope, barometer, ambient light sensor

battery

208 mAh / about a week of daily use (declared up to 13 days)

Water resistance

5-atmosphere pressure / IP68 certificate

Speaker and microphone

does not have

connections

Bluetooth version 5.3 / does not have Wi-Fi

Before we go to the features, let me tell you about the feel of the Galaxy Fit 3. Samsung’s new smart band with an aluminum body weighing only 18.5 grams is very light, comfortable, and well-made, and although it has relatively large dimensions, it fits well on narrow wrists.

The Fit 3 silicone strap, which you can get in three colors, black, white, and rose gold, is very soft and high-quality, and it has changed from the previous generation’s integrated mode, where the screen was placed inside, to a more standard two-piece model. Fastening the strap and connecting it to the wristband is done easily; Perhaps the only fault that can be found is that there are not enough holes on the strap to firmly fasten the body on narrow wrists.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 in white, rose gold and black models together

Having said that, if you are the type of person who wants to monitor your health status 24 hours a day, even while you sleep, the Galaxy Fit 3 is a more logical choice of watch, because apart from the lower price (albeit at the expense of fewer features), it is smaller and weighs less. Almost half of the Galaxy Watch 6; So it won’t bother you when you sleep.

In addition, Galaxy Fit 3 benefits from the highest certificate of resistance against dust penetration (IP68) and resistance up to 5-atmosphere pressure (50 meters depth) against water penetration so that you can easily use it to record information related to swimming in the pool.

Currently, it is not possible to connect Galaxy Fit 3 to iPhone

Galaxy smartwatches and wristbands are specially optimized for the Samsung ecosystem and then for Android phones, they are usually compatible with the iPhone (with some limitations of course); But currently, it is not possible to connect the Galaxy Fit 3 to the iPhone, because the Galaxy Fit application in the App Store does not support the new generation of Samsung wristbands. So, if you have an iPhone and want to use the sports and health features of other brands for a much lower price than the Apple Watch, you have to leave the Galaxy Fit 3 out of your options for now.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 on the wrist
Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 on the wrist

Like the previous two generations, Galaxy Fit 3 uses the open-source operating system FreeRTOS, which can be considered a lighter and simpler version of WearOS. Samsung has preferred using FreeRTOS for its smartwatch because cheaper and less powerful chips can handle it well and do not lag. In addition, the life of the battery increased many times; Fit 3’s battery lasted about a week in my daily use, while continuous monitoring of heart rate, stress, and sleep was active, but Always-on was disabled, and I spent 30 minutes exercising and 15 minutes checking the time and notifications. With a day or two of charging, the Galaxy Watch 6 is fantastic.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 in three models: white, rose gold and black

The FreeRTOS user interface is similar to WearOS in many ways, and even the application icons are almost the same; But unlike WearOS, it does not support Google Play and the ability to install external applications, and you have to go with the same default apps; including health application, music control, phone finder, weather, calendar, timer, alarm, stopwatch, world clock, calculator and camera shutter control. Galaxy Fit 3 has almost all smartband applications; However, the possibility of downloading favorite applications may not be pleasant for some users.

FreeRTOS operating system, smooth, simple, and fast but more limited than WearOS

The Samsung Health app for the Galaxy Fit 3 is one of the most complete and useful apps that can be found on the smartwatch. In this application, you can see various information, including the number of steps, how long you have exercised in a week, the amount of calories and water consumed, and the heart rate. By tapping on each, the corresponding app will open with more data. There is also information related to the prediction of menstruation in this section, which, unlike the Huawei Watch GT4, which works based on information such as heart rate, skin temperature, and breathing, only relies on the information entered in the calendar.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 strap connection
Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 strap connection

Leaving aside the limitation of FreeRTOS in installing applications, during the time I was testing the Galaxy Fit 3, the operating system performed very smoothly and even appeared as good as the Galaxy Watch 6. Fit 3’s user interface is also very simple and straightforward. By pressing the physical home button once, you will return to the main screen. Pressing the button twice will open the list of workouts, where you can choose another application for this command from the Advanced Feature section of the smartband settings.

There is a long delay in sending notification messages to the Galaxy Fit 3

Galaxy Fit 3 uses simple and standard gestures to access different parts of the wristband; Swiping up shows the list of applications, swiping down shows quick settings, swiping left shows the Tile (Tile) or the applications card, and swiping right shows notifications. In the tile environment, you can add up to 12 different cards. The notification text also supports Farsi language and emoji, although it takes about 28 seconds for the message notification to be displayed on the smart band.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 user interface

Unfortunately, on the Galaxy Fit 3, unlike the Galaxy Watch, there is no possibility to reply to a message, and at best, you can only send predefined replies, which are not very useful. I think it’s time for sending messages from smart watches and wristbands to become a standard, not to remain exclusive to luxury devices.

Galaxy Fit 3 does not lack in the watch face department; From the Wearable application, you can access more than a hundred watch faces with various designs and colors. If none of the watch faces catch your eye, you can use your favorite images and edit them with the application’s tools, and even change the color of the time display for better readability on any background. Samsung also lets you switch between watchfaces you’ve created by saving multiple images in the Watchfaces section and tapping on the Fit 3’s home screen.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 watch in the application

Galaxy Fit 3 has almost all the health and sports features of Galaxy Watch 6 (except ECG and irregular heart rate measurement, which is not available in Iran), but in some features, it shows different accuracy; For example, in the heart rate test, the Fit 3 was about 5% different from the Watch 6. While I was sleeping, with both devices strapped to my wrist, the Galaxy Watch 6 reported that the blood oxygen level dropped below 90%, but the Fit 3 reported everything as normal. In the stress test, Watch 6 showed a slightly lower stress level.

Tests

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3

Samsung Galaxy Watch 6

heart beat

77 beats per minute

81 beats per minute

blood oxygen level (SpO2)

98 percent

96 percent

stress test

medium

Average down

In sleep monitoring, Galaxy Fit 3 appeared very accurate and provided complete statistics; including sleep duration, different stages of sleep, sleep score, and even blood oxygen level recording during sleep. If you activate the snore detection option from the application, the phone’s microphone will record your snoring sound.

Galaxy Fit 3 sleep monitor screenshot
Galaxy Fit 3 sleep monitor screenshot
Galaxy Fit 3 sleep monitor screenshot

Galaxy Fit 3 has over a hundred workouts to cover almost any sport you want. For some sports activities, including walking, running, elliptical, and swimming, which have just been added, it has an automatic detection mode so that if you forget to start the workout, the smart band will start the corresponding workout after a few minutes. Fit 3’s pedometer was also about 10 steps different from reality and is generally accurate.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 workouts
Fit 3 is equipped with two new safety functions, fall detection, and Emergency SOS

The Galaxy Fit 3 uses two new safety features, including Fall Detection and Emergency SOS, which are present in the Apple Watch and Samsung’s WearOS-based devices. If you fall while exercising, the Fit 3 will call the emergency services or a selected person from your contact list thanks to the fall detection feature.

By activating Emergency SOS and selecting a person as an emergency contact, you can send your location to this person by pressing the button 5 times. If you have already entered your medical information, it will be displayed on the screen of the smart band.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 call rejection
Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 fall detection capability

The Galaxy Fit 3 is now equipped with an ambient light sensor to adjust the screen brightness according to the environment. Samsung hasn’t announced the Fit 3’s maximum brightness, but it seems to be around the 600 nits we’d expect from this price range.

Samsung’s new smart band uses two interesting features in the security department that may come in handy; First, you can choose a pin code for it; As long as the smart band is on your wrist, you don’t need to enter a passcode, but as soon as you remove it from your wrist, the device is locked and a PIN code is required to unlock it.

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 display, white model

The second feature, which is enabled by default, prevents the display of notifications as long as the smartband is not attached to your wrist. For example, if you put the Galaxy Fit 3 on the table and leave it behind the table, another person cannot read the messages; Of course, if you notice that the notifications are not displayed even when you wear the smartband on your wrist, disable this feature from the security section, because there is probably an interference between the skin of your hand and the sensor.

Is the Galaxy Fit 3 worth buying?

Samsung Galaxy Fit 3 in white, rose gold and black models together

So far, we talked about the features and capabilities that seem to put the Galaxy Fit 3 almost at the level of the Galaxy Watch 6; But the Samsung Smartband lacks some of the basic functions of the Galaxy Watch, including built-in GPS, speaker, and microphone for answering calls, sending replies to messages, installing additional applications from Google Play, Wi-Fi connectivity and LTE options, and models with different sizes to better fit the size of the watch. Different wrists. In terms of appearance, the Galaxy Watch has a more luxurious and attractive design and is more similar to a classic watch.

Considering the differences, the Galaxy Fit 3 cannot be considered a replacement for the Galaxy Watch 6. If answering calls and messages, internal GPS, installing applications and the classic appearance of the watch is not your priority, and at the same time you want the device to be attached to your wrist all the time, the battery life is satisfactory, and to spend half the price of the Galaxy Watch, the Galaxy Fit 3 at a price of about 4 4.5 million tomans is a more appropriate choice in the Iranian market; But if you don’t care about staying in the Samsung ecosystem and a bigger screen, and you just want to get a smart band for your Android phone with all the health and sports features, including swimming, the Xiaomi Smart Band 8 with a price of around 1.5 to 2 million Tomans seems like an attractive option. .

Positive points

  • Great battery life
  • Big and bright AMOLED display
  • Fall detection and Emergency SOS
  • Light, and comfortable with a soft strap and metal frame
  • Has the most important health and sports capabilities

Negative points

  • Unable to answer calls and messages
  • Unable to install the application
  • Lack of built-in GPS
  • Not compatible with iPhone

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The biography of Pavel Durov

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Pavel Durov
Some people call Pavel Durov the savior of personal privacy, and others call him the operator of the dark and dangerous Telegram empire; But who is the person behind one of the most popular messengers in the world?

The Biography of Pavel Durov

Russian Mark Zuckerberg, home of the tech world in self-imposed exile with a reclusive spirit and all-black outfits to pay homage to the movie The Matrix. These are the terms used to describe Pavel Durov, the founder of the Telegram messenger; The man who revolutionized the Russian Internet by founding the VKontakte social network, stood up against government pressure, and became an angel of user privacy and data security with his libertarian beliefs.

Pavel Durov is not a fan of interviews and is rarely talked about in the media. If you want to know more about the life of this mysterious and rebellious character, follow this article.

Table of Contents

  • The story of a rebellious entrepreneur
  • Pavel Durov; Russian Mark Zuckerberg
  • Tensions begin and Durov says goodbye to VK
  • Personal life of Pavel Durov
  • Nikolay Durov
  • Pavel Durov’s residence 
  • Pavel Durov’s nationality 
  • Pavel Durov’s fortune
  • Pavel Durov’s income from Telegram
  • Paul Durov’s moral qualities 
  • Who is the Telegram team made up of?
  • Where is Telegram based?
  • Interesting facts about Pavel Durov
  • Pavel Durov and Telegram
  • Telegram vs WhatsApp 
  • Telegram and terrorism 
  • Golden sentences from Pavel Durov

The story of a rebellious entrepreneur

Pavel Durov, the founder of the Russian social network VKontakte, was sitting alone in his apartment in St. Petersburg when a group of men in uniform and armed with guns knocked on his door. Pavel quietly approached the door and peered into the corridor. Then he went to the window and saw many of them standing outside the building. He decided not to open the door and ignored the shouts behind the door calling his name. Then his phone rang and unknown numbers called him one after another. Powell did not return any of these calls.

Powell knew why the officers had come to his house. A few days earlier, he had received a letter from the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation (FSB), a CIA-like organization, asking him to remove pages on VKontakte that were used to organize popular protests.

But Powell not only refused to do so, but the day after receiving the letter he upgraded the website to include more posts on each page. On the same day, he posted a photo of the letter along with the image of a dog in a hoodie sticking out its tongue on Twitter and wrote that this was his official response to the request of the FSB.

After an hour of Paul’s indifference, the armed men behind the door finally left the building; But in front of Pavel was a difficult battle that ultimately led to his defeat; Of course, the failure that was the beginning of his entry into the vast and exciting world of messengers and concerns about privacy and user data. If the agents had not come to his house for inspection that day and Durov had not been so involved with the idea of ​​user data security, maybe there would be no trace of Telegram today or it would not exist in the form it is today.

Pavel Durov; Russian Mark Zuckerberg

The VKontakte platform known as VK is the most popular social network in Russia with 500 million user accounts and 90 million monthly visits (2019) and is more popular among Russian users than Facebook and Twitter. Durov launched the social network at the age of 22 and is often compared to Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook. Both giants of the Internet world were born in 1984, and their serious entry into the world of virtual communication started from their student days.

Banknote rockets later inspired the Telegram icon

Durov avoids the attention of the official media, prefers black and non-luxurious clothes, and steals his gaze from the camera; But when it comes to interacting with people, he is more sociable than his American counterpart. When one of VK’s senior managers received a large bonus, Durov told the other members that he was not in it for the money. Upon hearing this statement, his colleagues asked him to return the money he received if it is true. This person agreed to throw the money out the window. Durov told him that his method of throwing money out was not creative and showed him how to make 5,000 ruble bills (about $70) into paper rockets and then throw them out the window into the street. These banknote rockets later inspired the Telegram icon.

According to Vice, Durov got the idea of ​​creating a social network when a friend who studied in America showed him an early version of Facebook. Thus, VK was launched as a beta in September 2006 and had an official and legal organization in 2007. Even today, the design of this social network looks like the original version of Zuckerberg’s design.

For the first few years, VK was almost a Spotify-style library of all kinds of media, including black-market movies and music. According to Katya Romanovskaya, one of the authors of the satirical Twitter account @KermlinRussia, “almost everything on VK was illegal” in those days.

Read more: Is Telegram really safe?

Tensions begin and Durov says goodbye to VK

Vkontakte social network

When Putin announced his intention to run for re-election in late 2011, opposition groups flocked to VK and organized public protests by publishing news and material against Putin. Even the leader of the opposition party, Alexei Navalny, was the administrator of a VK page with over 100,000 followers, and when the website’s algorithm automatically blocked his page for excessive activity, Durov came to his rescue and changed the website’s algorithm.

VK had the full attention of the FSB intelligence agency. The day government agents knocked on Durov’s door, his rebellious spirit flared up. Durov refused to remove the protest pages and emphasized that VK is a 100% non-political organization and that removing these pages would cause users to migrate from VK and cause a severe financial blow to his team’s business.

The Kremlin left VK alone for a while; But in early 2013, Durov’s troubles began again. In a report, Russian news outlet Novaya Gazeta released several hacked emails between Durov and the Kremlin’s “main ideologist,” Vladislav Surkov, and claimed the VKontakte founder had been working with the FSB for years.

According to the editor of RuNet Echo, many VK users did not believe such a report; But this was only the beginning of the campaign against Dwarf. In April of the same year, a car belonging to Ilya Perkopsky, the chief executive of VK, ran over a police officer. The driver ran away from the scene, But the police claimed that the person behind the wheel was Durov. In response to this accusation, Durov said that he does not know how to drive.

A few days later, police officers began searching VK’s offices in Moscow, according to the Moscow Times. The reason for this inspection was announced as “part of the investigation into the accident and fleeing the scene”. The next day, the two main investors of VK, Vyacheslav Mirilashvili and Lev Lviv, announced their intention to sell their 48% stake. Investors were looking to sell their shares because of the rift between them and Durov, according to multiple sources. According to Interfax, the value of this social network at that time was 2 billion dollars.

Durov fled to Buffalo, New York later that month and began work on his new project, Telegram. The police finally stopped pursuing the accident case.

At that time, 88% of VK shares were held by government supporters and 12% were still held by Durov. Durov announced that he did not intend to sell his shares and his activity on this platform continued until the end of 2013. On his VK page, Pavel wrote about the website’s growth compared to other social networks, including Facebook and WhatsApp, and published an infographic showing that in October 2013, VK was the top Android app in Moscow.

But in January 2014, Durov announced that he had sold his entire 12% stake to the mobile phone operator Megaphone for $300 million. In an interview with Motherboard magazine, he said: “It was clear that my 12% share did not give me much decision-making power, But it could be used to limit my freedom in critical situations.” With Durov selling his shares, VK was now 100% under the financial control of Kremlin allies.

Durov lost his financial investment; But for how long did he remain as the general manager of VK? On April 1, 2014, he finally announced his resignation from the board of directors of VK citing the excessive involvement of new shareholders in the management of the website. Of course, two days later, he claimed that his resignation was April’s lie and tried to withdraw the letter; But the shareholders did not allow him to do this. On April 22, Durov found out that he was officially fired from VK.

Durov was forced to sell his shares due to political pressure and had to say goodbye to the big company he founded forever, But this happened at the right time. He said in an interview with Motherboard:

The Russian Internet market fell dramatically after this incident. In a way, I am grateful to the shareholders and political forces that made me sell my shares. Now I am more satisfied that I can serve the audience on a wider scale than the world.

Personal life of Pavel Durov

Pavel Valerievich Durov was born on October 10, 1984, in Saint Petersburg and grew up in an educated family. Pavel is the second child in the family and has an older brother named Nikolai, who was with him in launching the social network VK and Telegram.

As a child, Pavel had to move to Italy with his family because of his father’s job and studied first grade in the city of Turin. Two years later, the whole family returned to Russia, and after four years of secondary education, Pavel went to the Dmitri Fadeev School of Mathematics and Physics at St. Petersburg State University, where he studied all subjects, including four foreign languages, in-depth.

From the age of 11, Pavel was very interested in programming with his brother. After finishing high school with excellent grades, he studied English language translation at the Faculty of Philosophy of St. Petersburg University.

Pavel Durov speaks 8 languages ​​including Farsi

According to information on Pavel’s official VK page, he speaks eight foreign languages: Russian, English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Latin and even Farsi. Of course, it is not possible to say how true this information is.

In university, Pavel was one of the best students with a high level of intelligence. He has repeatedly won linguistics, programming, and design olympiads, has received scholarships from the Government of the Russian Federation and the President of the Russian Federation, and is a three-time winner of the Potanin Innovation Award.

While a student, he launched the website durov.com, which housed a database of educational materials for humanities students. Then he came up with the idea of ​​another website (spbgu.ru) where St. Petersburg University students could communicate with each other through its forum.

On this site, each student had his personal account, which included information such as name, faculty, and list of friends and groups. Any user could also blog on this website. This is how the initial version of the VK social network was born. To promote his website, Powell organized beauty and design contests at the university and sometimes engaged in heated discussions with an anonymous account to create excitement on the website’s forum.

Durov spends most of his time on innovation, self-improvement, and entrepreneurship. Now everyone knows him as the founder of Telegram, which in a way embodies all his ideals in the field of user data security.

Nikolay Durov

We all know Telegram with Pavel Durov; While Pavel’s brother, Nikolai, also played a big role in the formation of this popular messenger.

In fact, Nikolai’s role in the development of all the projects discussed, from the durov.com website to this Telegram, is very prominent. He showed interest in natural sciences from his childhood; While Powell’s interest was in the field of humanities. Despite this difference, these two brothers had a common interest and that was programming.

Nikolai, who was a talented programmer, wrote a few lines of code for the VKontakte platform when it was still in the early stages of development, and then, as the popularity of this social network grew, he became more involved in its development and eventually took the position of technical manager and senior developer of the company. Nikolai worked on this platform until 2014 when Pavel resigned from the VK board and took the entire team out of the country with him.

In an interview with Medium, Powell said that his brother played a big role in developing his ideas. He mentions Nikolai as a genius who solved complex mathematical equations quickly in TV competitions, read a lot of books, and came first in almost all math competitions.

Pavel Durov’s residence

Durov left Russia in April 2014 and said he would never return to his homeland. Because the internet rules in this country are not clear it is impossible to do online business there.

Pavel is now a bit of a homebody, traveling around the world with his team of programmers and usually not staying in one country for more than a few months. Since leaving Russia, he has lived in Berlin, London and Singapore.

Currently, he and the Telegram development team live in Dubai. It is written in the FAQ section of Telegram that they are satisfied with life in Dubai; But as soon as the internet laws of this country change, they are ready to change their location.

Pavel Durov’s citizenship

The nature of Pavel Dorf

In the spring of 2013, Powell received the citizenship of this small country by donating $250,000 to the St. Kitts and Nevis island fund in the Caribbean and investing in it. With a passport to this country, he can travel without a visa to 132 countries of the world, including the European Union and England.

Of course, Pavel’s new citizenship was revealed only in 2014; That is when he had officially left Russia, and this showed that Pavel had been thinking about leaving his homeland for a long time. Pavel Durov’s fortune

According to Forbes magazine, Pavel Durov’s financial situation has been growing since 2016. In the ranking of the 200 richest Russians in 2016, he ranked 135th with 600 million dollars, and by 2020, he was promoted to the 30th position with a fortune equal to 3.4 billion dollars.

Pavel Durov’s income from Telegram

Telegram income

Pavel made a fortune of 500 million dollars from the sale of his 12% stake in VK and is very interested in the field of cryptocurrency. He also managed to collect about 1.7 billion dollars from investors for the development of the Telegram-based blockchain known as TON; A project that, of course, failed; But Durov does not earn any income from Telegram.

Telegram is completely free, without ads and in-app payments, and Durov pays the cost of maintaining this platform completely from his own pocket. Of course, Durov has announced in a post that if he runs out of money to run Telegram, he will probably have to turn to public donations or in-app payments; But he will never enter the world of advertising.

Paul Durov’s moral qualities

Pavel is a supporter of the school of libertarianism in the political and economic fields. This view of his is clearly evident in his unwillingness to cooperate with government organizations. He believes that no person or structure has the right to violate private property or personal information of people.

Powell supports the standardization of the educational system; Because he believes that modern schools in the West are a relic of the industrial era and educate people with stereotyped and closed views. He predicts that education in the future will be interactive and decentralized.

Powell supports high taxes on industries that are active in the extraction of raw materials and the abolition of taxes in the field of information and customs. He also believes that taxpayers should choose what projects their taxes will be spent on.

Durov also believes that the cancellation of registration, passports, entry visas, and military service is necessary, and he considers these to be the cornerstones of the feudal system. In his opinion, movement restrictions cause brains to escape.

Pavel is not interested in doing interviews and prefers to be in contact with the audience directly through his posts on the Telegram channel and website.

When Pavel was 33 years old, he stated in a post that he had not consumed sugar, meat, or fast food for a long time, did not drink energy drinks, tea, and coffee, turned away from nicotine and alcohol and does not watch TV.

Who is the Telegram team made up of?

Telegram is run by Pavel Durov and his brother Nikolai. Pavel supports Telegram from the economic and ideological aspects and Nikolai from the technological aspect. To build Telegram, Nikolai created a unique custom data protocol called MTProto, which is open-source, secure, and optimized for use in multiple data centers. Details of the other people involved in the project are unknown, although Powell mentioned in a 2016 interview that his team consisted of 15 people.

Where is Telegram based?

Most of the Telegram developers were born in St. Petersburg, and after the tension with the Russian government, they left the country with Pavel and his brother and settled in Berlin, London, and Singapore for a while.

Telegram team members are currently in Dubai and are ready to change their place of residence again if the internet regulations of this country change.

Interesting facts about Pavel Durov

Powell dresses distinctively. In the photos, he always wears black clothes, and this is a kind of homage to his character Neo in the movie Matrix; For this reason, he is sometimes called Neo-Russian. In a book about Durov, Nikolai Kononov wrote that “he sees himself as the engineer of his own world”, and this description is somewhat consistent with the world of The Matrix.

Pavel learned to code while in school and used this skill to change the welcome screen image of the school computers to annoy a teacher he didn’t like. Pavel has a close relationship with his brother, who is also a skilled coder.

Pavel launched the VKontakte social network at the age of 22. The VKontakte office was located on the fifth and sixth floors of the iconic Singer House building in St. Petersburg.

In 2011, when Russian authorities asked Durov to remove some anti-government posts from VK, Durov responded by posting a photo of a dog wearing a hoodie and sticking out its tongue.

In 2012, Pavel and some VK employees made paper rockets worth more than a thousand dollars and threw them out the window. The value of each rocket was about 70 dollars. This movement later inspired the Telegram icon.

According to reports, Durov spends $1 million of his own money every month to run Telegram. To date, this platform has not generated a single dollar for Durov.

The number of monthly active Telegram users reached 100 million in 2016. Durov celebrated this success by throwing a big party in Barcelona.

Durov planned to raise 2 billion dollars from investors to run his company with the initial offering of a coin called “Gram” on the Telegram Open Network blockchain, But this project was stopped by the decision of the American court.

The popularity of Telegram is increasing every year. In 2021, the number of active Telegram users reached 500 million people per month. Telegram is most popular in Iran, Russia, Malaysia, Ukraine, India, Italy, Spain and Saudi Arabia.

Pavel Durov and Telegram

Founded in 2013, Telegram uses a secure end-to-end encryption method that makes it nearly impossible to decrypt messages. This feature, along with being free without a single ad or in-app purchases, has made Telegram take a significant share of the market from Facebook Messenger and other competitors; But this platform with 500 million active users per month is far behind WhatsApp with 2 billion users and Facebook Messenger with 1.3 billion users; But Durov says that the growth of Telegram is fast and most new users enter the world of Telegram through the suggestion of other users.

Our growth depends only on our users who recommend their friends to download and use Telegram. Every day, 350 thousand new users register in Telegram, without any effort on our part.

Durf attaches great importance to the principle of simplicity in the design of Telegram. In an interview with Wired in 2016, he said:

15 billion messages are sent daily through Telegram. Telegram’s main engineering team consists of 15 people, and obviously with this number, we had to automate many tasks and hand them over to scripts and artificial intelligence.

Telegram does not generate a single dollar of revenue for Durov, it has no permanent office and consists of a very small team. Before settling in Dubai, the Telegram team moved every two to four months. Dorf has announced that his team is ready to leave Dubai for a new destination if needed.

The company is so confident in the security of its proprietary protocol, called MTProto, developed by Nikolai, that it is offering a $200,000 reward to anyone who can hack it. It’s not an uncommon move to offer rewards to users who find bugs in products, But bounties of this magnitude are usually only reserved for critical bugs in widely used programs such as Windows.

According to Durov, no one has succeeded in hacking MTProto so far; But a Russian man who managed to find a serious problem in Telegram in 2014 was rewarded with $100,000.

Telegram is open source and allows any developer to create their own Telegram even for desktop computers. Today, most new messaging services, including WhatsApp, create applications for use in all situations and do not allow disparate developers to access their code. Of course, they can’t be blamed, because it’s difficult to maintain a centralized language and a single security model across several different applications. Meanwhile, monetizing a platform requires more planning than monetizing a simple paid app.

However, the VKontakte platform has gained a lot of success by allowing developers to build their own alternatives from it. More importantly, Telegram operates as a non-profit organization and does not intend to charge users for its services or sell their information to third parties or governments.

The company wrote on its FAQ page:

Telegram is not built for monetization and never accepts advertising or external investment. We are not looking to create a “user base”, but we are looking to create messaging for people.

In a post on Telegram, Durov announced that in 2021, to manage the costs of a platform with 500 million users, he will add a monetization section to Telegram. This section includes new paid features, paid stickers, and a platform called Ad Platform for commercial channel owners to generate income.

Telegram vs WhatsApp

The main difference between Telegram and WhatsApp is its highly encrypted structure, open API for access by developers and other users, and its strictly anti-commercial manifesto. In a world where Facebook simply buys its competitors (including WhatsApp for a whopping $22 billion), Durov’s refusal to sell Telegram is truly admirable; And of course, we should not forget its many, completely free and artistic stickers.

Users are becoming more aware of the importance of their privacy and looking for ways to protect their data. For this reason, Telegram has not sold a single byte of data from its users to any third party since its launch, which has significantly increased the popularity of this platform.

However strict privacy policies and strong data encryption are not enough to attract users who have depended on WhatsApp for years. In order to be able to compete with giants like WhatsApp and Facebook in the suffocating market of messengers, Telegram needs to be better in every way: faster message transmission speed, more beautiful design, more features, and attractive features in every update. It is only in this way that it is possible to provide better privacy and security than WhatsApp to users who may not be sufficiently concerned about security.

Telegram and terrorism

Telegram Pavel Dorf

Telegram’s strict policy on privacy and its non-cooperation with the authorities of countries to provide users’ information have made some people consider this platform dangerous and a place for terrorists and criminals to operate without supervision. In fact, in a new report published in June 2021, the German magazine Spiegel described Telegram as a dark empire, the most dangerous messenger, and the “equivalent of the dark web in the pocket” of users.

Critics of Telegram describe it as the dark web in users’ pockets

In 2016, Telegram blocked 78 public channels promoting ISIS ideology. Durov told Wired that the company is building tools to deal with malicious channels more effectively.

Is this enough? Probably not, as we are a small team and trying to hire more people to review reports and requests. We are gradually building a tool to automate this process. All this takes time, but we try to consider it one of our priorities. 

In response to criticism of Telegram’s 100% protection of user data, Durov said in one of his interviews during the Mobile World Congress:

The political solutions proposed against cryptography are not supposed to be effective against terrorism. If you block a site like Telegram, terrorists won’t even notice.

Golden sentences from Pavel Durov

Paul Dorf's sentences

– Don’t give up until you have a really exciting idea. If you’re on the fence about a decision, go get some sleep and see how you feel about it when you wake up.

– In order to accomplish something, you must have enthusiasm, curiosity, and the ability to facilitate the process. The meaning of making it easier is to remove all the additions and focus completely on the essence of the matter.

– Success means being excited about what you are doing and focusing on it.

– If your mind is busy with several projects and you can’t concentrate well, go read books unrelated to business and technology. Give your mind a break and let it think about different topics in comfort for a while.

– People value social status too much. What difference does it make if you live in London or the countryside? As long as you have internet, there is no difference between the two. Life in the village is healthier and cheaper, But people prefer to live in expensive cities and pay a lot of money for rent. The only reason they are in that city is to have a job so they can pay rent and buy expensive appliances. This is a vicious circle.

– If you want your life to be simpler, you need to get rid of other people’s voices in your head. We are too influenced by people around us; Our relatives and friends and what they think about what constitutes success or what is good or bad. We must completely get rid of these influences. We should be able to be indifferent to what others think or say about our work. After this step, we should focus only on what we need.

Where there is no competition, there is no progress

– Spend more time in solitude and silence and be happy about it. People get addicted to being in groups. For example, in America, when two people sit together in silence, they feel awkward. Sometimes you need to have a space that is not influenced by anyone.

– The most important personality traits for a founder are love and passion for building, curiosity, self-discipline, passion, and persistence.

– What people don’t know about Renaissance men is that these people didn’t pursue several different professions at the same time. Maybe some of them were like this, But most of them would choose one area and concentrate on building it completely and then move on to the next project. We humans can do many things, but not simultaneously.

– When something happens that I can’t change, I prefer to think about the good sides of it because every event, even the most tragic ones, has good and bad sides. You just have to see them and focus on them. It’s useless to be upset about something you can’t change. You have to adapt to the situation and think about what can be done with what you have.

– Learn foreign languages ​​to deepen your understanding of the world and to open unprecedented opportunities for learning progress, and career growth.

– The value of money is overrated, because making and creating is more attractive than consuming, and the inner state is incomparably more important than the outer world.

– Where there is no competition, there is no progress.

– The value of communication and conversation has been greatly exaggerated. An hour alone is more useful than a week of talking.

Emphasizing secure communication and libertarian ideas, Pavel Durov is a person with independent thinking who has covered these ideas comprehensively in the development of the Telegram project. What do you think about this character and his moral qualities? Is the Dwarf Telegram a dark and dangerous empire or a glimmer of light in the insecure world of the Internet?

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