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Review of Xiaomi Poco F4 GT phone, price and technical specifications

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Poco F4 GT

Reviews of Xiaomi Poco F4 GT phone, price, technical specifications, design, screen, software, hardware, battery life and charging and other specifications of this phone. Checking the technical specifications of the latest mid-range Xiaomi phone.

Review of Xiaomi Poco F4 GT phone, price and technical specifications

Introduction

Gaming phones: They are like regular phones, but more for gaming. What does this even mean? What makes a game phone a gaming phone? More performance? Better cooling (sometimes with dedicated fans either internally or externally attached)? More game-oriented features like dedicated buttons? A design that makes gaming bold? RGB lights? All of the above?

What is a gaming phone? And is the Poco F4 GT a gaming phone? Does that mean it’s only good for professional gamers or can regular people enjoy it? There are really too many questions. In this article, we are going to examine exactly this: Of course, ordinary people can buy this device and enjoy it. It’s not like there’s such a thing as “overperformance.” 

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Poco’s GT line boasts ‘gaming’, but it does so in a quieter tone than other device families – think Red Magics, ROG Phones and the like. These are all gaming phones, but they’re different, and the Poco F4 GT seems to be on the tamer side of things, especially if you get it in any color that isn’t yellow.

Gaming aside, this phone also came with the flagship chipset of its time, so it could easily fall into the category of ‘flagship killer’ or ‘budget flagship’. So is it great at any of them, or is it trying to be too many things to too many people without actually being great at any of them?

Poco F4 GT long-term review

This is what we set out to find out. We’ll say this from the start: this will not be a game-focused review. None of our long-term reviews have ever been done, and we’re not starting now. Most people overseas aren’t heavy mobile gamers, but most people there probably wouldn’t mind knowing if the Poco F4 GT could do well for them at its reasonable price. And not necessarily thanks to its game pieces, that is. But it can definitely be nice to have them.

So let’s dig in and find out what the Poco F4 GT is all about, this is the first time we’ve reviewed a gaming phone at length, and it’s also the first time we’ve fully reviewed a device from the Poco GT line. So let’s check it properly.

Xiaomi Poco F4 GT phone design review

Poco F4 GT long-term review

This might strike a very interesting balance for many people – for example, gamers who have office jobs and don’t want their phone to stand out too much while still offering gaming looks and features? This is certainly a very niche niche, but perhaps you can think of some others as well.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

The point here is that there’s a theme to the design, and it’s on target, but it doesn’t go so far as to make the entire product off-putting to those who aren’t in the demographic that’s clearly being targeted here.

From the front, the Poco F4 GT looks just like any other mid-range or budget flagship device that has come out in the last year or two, and that’s all we can say about it. There’s a hole for the selfie camera, the screen is flat, the bezels are reasonably small (though the chin is bigger than most), and now let’s look elsewhere.

You can also see Xiaomi 13T Pro review, price and specifications

Poco F4 GT long-term review

On the right is where things get really interesting as it’s busier than what you’d normally see on a Poco phone. It’s so crowded, in fact, that the volume rocker has to be moved to the left, even though it’s on the right on other Xiaomi/Redmi/Poco phones. And that’s to open the game’s magnetic pop-ups – one at the top and one at the bottom. Will gamers like these? Maybe.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

If you’re not a gamer you’ll hate them? Well, it’s…complicated. The slide bits used to lock and unlock the triggers are always there, though they look and feel like buttons. While using this phone, your fingers are constantly touching them and it may or may not bother you.

The same goes for the placement of the volume rocker – other brands like Oppo have always had the volume buttons on the left side, and that’s a personal preference. For what it’s worth, the volume rocker on the left side was pretty easy for this reviewer to get used to.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

On the other hand, the trigger latch is never felt. Another point is that any case you might want to use requires an inordinate amount of cutting on the right side, which ends up making it rather flimsy. The one that comes in the box is thin and flimsy to begin with and so that definitely doesn’t help matters. On the contrary, it was one of the less enjoyable carrying cases we’ve had in the past few years.

We still very much appreciate the fact that there’s one in the box, don’t get me wrong. It’s a niche device from a fairly niche brand, so you’re unlikely to get a ton of third-party case options anyway. We just wish Poco would go back to the way it did a year or two ago, because they were more solid and felt anything but sloppy.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Flip over the Poco F4 GT, and its back design is a mix of two languages: the size and position of the camera island seems to be copied and pasted from many recent phones, but the design of the LED flash and lines on the back begs to be gaming. Expose this phone. And this design shows the gaming nature of this phone without being as bold as some competing options.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

We really like the LED flash design. It’s unusual but in a fun and interesting way. On the other hand, the nonsensical “freezing speediest” text on Camera Island is pretty weird. We should probably welcome the fact that the keyword “AI” doesn’t exist, but in all seriousness, please Chinese companies stop doing this. No one has ever bought or will buy a Poco F4 GT because “freezing speediest” sounds enticing, but many people might buy it despite how bad it sounds.

However, since our unit is destined for EU shores, there’s plenty of the usual writing on the back, while the Poco logo is oddly out of place here compared to some of the brand’s more affordable offerings. that we are used to the font, has subsided.Poco F4 GT long-term review

The glass back of this phone really gives you the feeling of a glass back and because of its matte, this phone is slippery. I hope you are not surprised by this. The symmetry of the rear design lines is welcome, plus nice little touches – like the fact that the volume rocker design mimics the center line as well as the camera island. Smooth edges are a trend (thanks Apple!), and Poco couldn’t hold back. We do not agree or disagree with them. We don’t feel like they make a significant difference in use for a device like this, as there’s far less “frame” to hold on the Poco F4 GT than any of the new iPhones.

Overall, the Poco F4 GT is solid, well-built, and premium, making it one of the affordable gaming flagships. If you don’t have small hands, then you will notice that the handling of this phone is similar to the handling of other phones today. In terms of size, it’s pretty average – not the biggest, but definitely not the smallest. It seems a bit heavy but we can call it comfortable to some extent. You will not feel tired after holding this phone for two hours.

Review of Xiaomi Poco F4 GT phone speakers

Poco F4 GT has four speakers, one is dual on the top and the other is dual on the bottom. Both are on the right side so that neither is muffled by your hands holding the phone when playing in landscape mode. It’s a very good decision on Poco’s part, and we like the setup a lot – not just for gaming, but it also works great when you’re watching videos in landscape mode.

As a result, we never had a problem hearing the speakers – it’s truly amazing what good positioning can really do. They’re honestly not the best speakers on the market, nor are they the loudest, but in the latter case, they’re pretty much the loudest, and that position just means they’re thoroughly enjoyable, whether for gaming, movies, or apps. Television and… of course even podcasts and similar things.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Again, don’t expect these features to be anything special, but then again, don’t expect them to be nothing special either, they’re great for everyday use and you won’t be disappointed – unless you’re constantly trying to use them in environments. Get pretty loud, but no phone speaker can really survive that.

It should be noted that the Poco F4 GT has the traditional Xiaomi / Redmi / Poco layout, whereby the handset and the top bezel are both outputs for an actual speaker. This means that if you’re talking with the Poco F4 GT in your ear, some of what you hear from the person on the other end will be transmitted through the upper speaker grille into your surroundings, which is inevitable. The result of the setup is obviously that if you use any kind of headphones, this will not cause any problems at all.

Vibration motor

The vibration motor  is one of the best out there, but unsurprisingly it’s the “feel it more than hear it” variety that seems to have won the 2020 vibration motor wars for whatever reason. What does this mean in practice? If you’re not touching the phone, if it’s not in active contact with your skin, you’re more likely to miss vibration notifications, even if it’s in the same room as you — and especially if it’s lying on the couch or carpet or similar. . The soft stuff on the tables is a little better, but even there, if you’re a few meters away, it’s game over. There just isn’t enough sound in it to call itself attention.

However, if you touch the phone, the engine provides excellent vibrations with a “3D” feeling with great depth. It is very versatile and enjoyable to use, but you need to set the vibration power to maximum. Otherwise, you won’t feel much at all. We’re all for customization and thus aren’t against this scale of power, but when only one end offers anything that remotely makes a sound, we have to wonder what the point is.

Haptic feedback settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Otherwise, in use, it’s still interesting that there are little jolts here and there in the UI that use the vibration engine, but they seem to be fewer and fewer as the months go by, and this is a real fact. Shame because this was one of the big differentiating factors in MIUI’s favor in the real world.

biometric

Poco F4 GT’s fingerprint sensor is embedded in the power button and it’s great. It’s easily among the most accurate we’ve ever used, and it’s also very fast. Our first time unlock rate is limited to 100% and there are only a few misses here and there throughout our time with the phone. There’s really not much to say here – it’s a great fingerprint sensor and we had absolutely no problems with it.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

I wish they were all as good as this one, especially the ones under the display. Honestly, if this sensor is any good, we’d take this side-mounted sensor over an on-screen sensor any day. If, like us, you are used to tapping it to unlock your phone, placing it inside the power button also helps a lot. By setting the unlock to press the button rather than just a touch (which in our experience leads to unwanted unlocks), it becomes a very seamless process, turning the screen on and off in one motion.

Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Biometrics settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Of course, there’s also face unlock, and it’s fast and works well, but it only uses the front-facing camera, which means it’s less secure than fingerprint unlock. And you also need to wake up the phone to engage. If you do it by pressing the power button… there’s no time for face unlock to work its magic because the fingerprint scanner has already let you in. Face unlock does its job and very fast too. Let’s note that we checked and found that it only works when your eyes are open.

Xiaomi Poco F4 GT screen review

The Poco F4 GT has a decent screen that could easily be great for its price. It’s bright enough to be seen outdoors even on a sunny summer day, though it won’t break any brightness records. Similarly, it gets dark enough that it’s not awkward to use in a black-and-white environment, but we wish more non-native phone makers would use Google’s “Extra Dim” feature in their skins. For those who are sensitive to light, it will be a real boon to be able to dim the screen even further than it is at its lowest setting. Alas, MIUI still has no trace of that feature, I hope it changes in the future.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

The automatic brightness curve is perfect in our subjective opinion. We only had to manually adjust it a couple of times where it got a little too bright indoors, but even then, most people were probably fine with what the phone had to offer. It’s always refreshing to use a phone with a good auto-brightness curve for an extended period of time, as one of the minor frustrations (the need to constantly adjust it) is simply not noticeable at all.

Display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

In terms of resolution, it’s certainly not a flagship phone. And yet, as we’ve mentioned many times before, most recently in our long-term review of the Xiaomi 12 Pro, we very, very doubt that most people will be able to tell the difference between such a “FHD+” and “QHD+” panel. One in real life, looking at the screen at normal usage intervals. And while you might feel that a gaming phone with a flagship chipset deserves a higher-resolution display, we’re sure that will add to the price tag. 

Screen quality and reading mode

Screen quality is excellent, with a native sRGB color mode, although you may struggle to achieve P3 accuracy, as the default Vivid color mode skews whites and grays significantly towards blue. Using a warm preset helps with this, but it also makes everything a bit too yellow.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

The Poco F4 GT Reading mode blue light filter  is probably the yellowest blue light filter we’ve ever come across. We wouldn’t say this is a downside, but something to keep in mind if you use blue light filters a lot. Most of them will skew orange if you max out the intensity slider. This light is always yellow, and if you’re used to other colors, it might seem confusing at first: it’s very yellow. After a few days, we got used to it and most likely you will get used to it too.

Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Color scheme and Reading mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

The MIUI Blue Light Filter is still the most comprehensive filter on the market, with all the usual features like the aforementioned intensity slider, timing capabilities (including sunset to sunrise, as well as custom ranges), but it outshines everyone else with its paper texture mode. (with its own separate intensity slider) as well as the ability to display “bright colors” (read: somewhat desaturated) and black and white on the screen. It’s the complete package, it’s a nightmare of blue light, and it’s something we always wish other UIs would be inspired by, even though it hasn’t happened yet.

Xiaomi Poco F4 GT refresh rate

The Poco F4 GT display refreshes at 120 Hz. So far so good. However, the way the settings are implemented is very annoying – we’re glad we only had to adjust this once. There’s a default mode that does whatever it wants, and then there’s custom. Only after selecting it you can choose between 60Hz and 120Hz, and in our opinion 120Hz would be a better option. There is no point in buying a phone with a screen with a high refresh rate and not using it.

Refresh rate settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Refresh rate settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

However, you should note that setting 120Hz here will not cause the panel to always update at 120Hz. This is basically a setting of the maximum allowed, but it is severely mislabeled. Even in this case, the phone goes lower when playing video, inside Google Maps and in the camera app. Games that support high frame rates get the full 120Hz, which is nice to see.

Let’s take a moment here and lament that Google Maps, an application that takes advantage of high refresh rates, is limited to 60Hz. Apart from that, as mentioned earlier, you will only notice the lack of refresh rate in the camera app. Otherwise, it always seems to use the highest refresh rate, which makes for a great user experience.

The display is always on

Unlike what we’ve seen on some Redmi models, the Always-on display can be set to actually be always on. There are other options too – to have it appear on a custom schedule or for ten seconds after a tap. While we’ve enjoyed always-on always-on displays for years, we’ve recently found that we really like the “ten seconds on tap” option since we use our phones so much during the day anyway. Obviously, you might enjoy other settings more. The point is that there are enough options for everyone here.

Always-on display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Always-on display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Always-on display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Always-on display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Always-on display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Always-on display settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

This continues when it comes to the always-on display look. You get a comprehensive list of analog and digital clocks, as well as different picture backgrounds and the “Kaleidoscope” option, which is always attractive and spectacular. Overall, MIUI’s AOD implementation is still among the most customizable out there, and that’s a good thing in our book – if you don’t want to mess with it too much, you can use the defaults, or you can really fine-tune it. to your preferences if you are so inclined.

The performance and smoothness of the phone

As a gaming phone, Poco F4 GT should perform amazingly. Otherwise, what’s the point, right? We’re happy to report that it does indeed live up to expectations, but only as far as the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 will allow. While it’s a true flagship chipset in every way, and will feel like it for any kind of casual use (including casual gaming), it has well-documented overheating issues, and the Poco F4 GT can’t completely escape them. run away It doesn’t matter how big the cooling system is.

Don’t get me wrong, the dual vapor chamber is huge, but put the phone through a throttling test and after a few (about ten) minutes, it drops down to about two-thirds without fail. So this is a typical feature of Snapdragon 8 Gen 1. So, if you’re a professional gamer who needs all the performance at all times, we suggest choosing a device with a Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 chip inside – and that’s thermally improved.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

For anyone who isn’t a heavy pro gamer, all of the above won’t matter, as the Poco F4 GT still feels very much like a premium device in use, no matter what you use it for. From throttling tests to long heavy gaming sessions.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

With that in mind, let’s gently turn our attention to the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT, everyone’s favorite subjective “metric” that isn’t easily obtained from the specs tab. The Poco F4 GT is one of the smoothest phones we’ve ever used for a long-term review. In fact, it is tied for second place with the Xiaomi 12 Pro. The OnePlus 10 Pro still has a very slight edge, but the Poco is nothing to scoff at. The software is smoother than other smartphones on the market, which is why we’ve enjoyed using it on a daily basis.

Checking the battery life and charging of Poco F4 GT phone

The Poco F4 GT showed admirable longevity throughout the time we got to know it for this long-term review. Battery life has been excellent with our use case described below. We never ran out of battery at the end of the day, and always managed at least 6 hours of screen-on time. On some good days, we’ve seen over 7 hours, and while that’s not at the top of the charts, it’s pretty close.

The best battery life we’ve seen so far with similar long-term review use is over 7 hours of screen-on time every day, and over 8 hours in some cases. The Poco isn’t quite there, but it’s close, and it’s been incredibly consistent every day – we haven’t seen any weird ups and downs. That’s certainly commendable, but far more exciting than battery life is charging time.

Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review Battery life snapshots - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Even though we’re starting to see 100W+ wired charging systems in various smartphones, there’s still no telling how much peace of mind these systems can give you — and in the case of the Poco F4 GT, it’s peace of mind. Highest battery life ever.

Typical usage of the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT includes about 12 to 16 hours off the charger each day, with a Wi-Fi 6 connection, about an hour or more of 5G mobile data, always-on location, and half an hour to an hour of GPS navigation. Via Waze, bluetooth always on and about an hour or two of listening to music or podcasts through the TWS headphones each day, as well as about an hour of phone calls.

With this kind of usage, we never needed to charge midday, but even if your use case is much more demanding (for example, a mobile data connection where the signal isn’t great), all you need is the charger and cable that comes with you in the box. has it. Zero to full takes an insane 17 minutes if you hit the boost button after plugging in, and about 20-21 minutes if you don’t.

 

Poco F4 GT long-term review

It’s so fast that it’s impossible not to be around an outlet for at least a long time at some point during the day, so “range anxiety,” if we may borrow a term from the EV space, should definitely not be a thing at all. With this phone if only everything was the same for cars…but we digress.

There’s no wireless charging because you’d have to cut some corners to get to this price point, but with wired charging this fast, you can’t say we’re missing out.

Xiaomi Poco F4 GT software review

Poco is part of the Xiaomi family. As such, unfortunately, all of our usual software tips for Xiaomi and Redmi phones apply here as well. We are primarily talking about the update track. Our Poco F4 GT European review unit is currently running MIUI 13.0.7 based on Android 12 with the August 2022 security patch.

We don’t blame Poco for not rolling out the Android 13 update earlier—few companies that aren’t Google haven’t. Also, as usual, we should note that MIUI is such a heavy shell that most of the user interface changes that Google introduces in each new version of Android don’t even make significant changes. Everything is nice and stylish. But a security patch level that is more than three months out of date? This is simply unacceptable.

Current software - Poco F4 GT long-term review Current software - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Xiaomi, Poco and Redmi simply need to improve in this area. We understand that issuing monthly security updates to all devices is a lot of work. But at least for the flagships, this should be done, and let’s not forget that the F4 GT is currently Poco’s top phone. 

As for that Android 13 update – it will probably happen. In 2023, most likely. Should it be less to get the latest version of the main operating system for the current flagship device of this brand? Certainly. Will Xiaomi, Redmi, and Poco care enough about this to invest the necessary resources to make major updates faster? Well, you know what they say. But based on how things have been so far, it’s unlikely. That investment has to come from somewhere, and consistently having the cheapest phones compared to the competition isn’t a recipe for huge profit margins, is it?

Poco F4 GT long-term review

So here’s the bottom line – you’ll pay less for the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT than a similarly specced Samsung, sometimes significantly less, and less in the way of software updates. Exhibition? It’s your personal call to make, but we wanted to make the situation as clear as possible.

MIUI 13

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s turn our attention to MIUI 13. This is… MIUI 13. It looks like MIUI 12.5, which was similar to MIUI 12 before it. We’ve been saying this for a while now – MIUI needs a new coat of paint right now. It’s been years of incremental improvements now, which we appreciate, but it’s getting a little old.

Of course, we say this as phone reviewers who have already seen MIUI 13 on a dozen or so devices. If you have no experience with it, you will definitely not get bored with it. But even on a more objective level, the design language has been the same for a while – maybe it’s time for a rethink? Even Apple did this when it introduced Dynamic Island this year.

Settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Functionally, it has all the bits and pieces you’d expect in a modern Android skin. There are parts of MIUI that are incredibly customizable – like the reading mode blue light filter and the always-on display, which we’ve talked about before, for example. There are a lot of built-in features, and as a result, some of them can be hard to find for the average user who spends hours in the settings figuring out where they are.

Xiaomi Poco F4 GT launcher

 The launcher is traditional Poco fare, with a bunch of options, but not so much that it becomes overwhelming to navigate through the settings. We’ve always thought it struck a good balance between not being simplistic (looking at you, Google) and not being overly confusing (something many third-party options can be guilty of).

Launcher - Poco F4 GT long-term review Launcher - Poco F4 GT long-term review Launcher - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Of course, as you’d expect in 2022, there’s an app drawer, and it even comes with some fairly neat options, some of which we really enjoy (app suggestions above), and others that never quite hit the mark. we have not seen (app handles) – but it’s possible, and if you do, they’re there. We like that there’s an option for the AZ navigation bar, as in our experience this is usually the fastest way to get to any particular app in the drawer, much faster than searching or scrolling manually, though keep in mind that this is for Those who like us have more than 200 apps installed.

Launcher settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Launcher settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Launcher settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Launcher settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

A word of caution if  you’re copying your data from another device – the setting to put new apps on the home screen seems to have random default behavior in the latest versions of MIUI. Sometimes it is off by default, as it should be. Other times, it’s on – and if you don’t check, hundreds of apps may be automatically added to your home screen after the data copying process is complete. If you like your device to be as close to iPhone in terms of user experience as possible, you will enjoy it. Otherwise, you should take a look at the launcher settings as soon as possible when you boot your phone for the first time.

Recents - Poco F4 GT long-term review Recents - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Fortunately, this build of MIUI has an option to display your recent apps in a horizontal scrolling list, although it’s not enabled by default. MIUI still insists on a two-column menu with vertical scrolling by default, and if you like that – great. Otherwise, like us, you’ll immediately switch to another way of doing things because it’s definitely a more familiar one, considering how every other shell out there implements a similar mechanism.

New control center, dark mode, RGB LED

Like all recent versions of MIUI, this version also includes the “new” Control Center, a very obvious rip-off of the iOS feature of the same name. Despite the lack of originality in its design, this works very well, but while we initially tried it on for good measure, we ended up going back to the “old” way of doing things. It makes more sense to us to have both notifications accessible, and Quick Settings toggles on the same screen – not to mention that because Quick Settings occupies the top of that screen, notifications are actually easier to access without complicated finger movements. 

Control center settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Control center settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Control center settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Swiping down from the left for notifications also doesn’t make sense to us because we’re right-handed, but if we were left-handed, we’d probably have the exact opposite view. As it is, between notifications and controls, we have to reach for the first mode a lot more during the day, and swiping down from the left side is more uncomfortable if you’re holding the phone in your right hand with your right thumb. Of course, you may disagree, which is why you can follow the new system if you prefer it.

Naturally, there’s also a dark mode, and here it’s a simple on/off affair, with no fancy “darkness levels” options like ColorOS and its derivatives. However, it works well, it can be scheduled (either with a custom interval or from sunset to sunrise), and in theory, it can even be forced into apps that don’t have one of their own. However, in practice there is only one app you can do this for.

Dark mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Dark mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Dark mode settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

That‘s great because that app is really in dire need of a dark theme, but in the past, features like this worked with every app — for whatever reason, not anymore, and the selection always looks great. limited We don’t know what’s going on here, but we can assure you that Amazon wasn’t the only app we installed that didn’t have its own dark theme.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Since this is a gaming phone, it can’t do without RGB LED action, and there are actually two LED strips inside the camera island that can be set to light up when charging, as well as for incoming calls. 

LED settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review LED settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

The LEDs can be used on a custom schedule, and they also work with Game Turbo if you want to – although if you’re playing, you won’t actually see them, so that’s on the agenda. contract. In our opinion, to let the people around you know that you have a gaming phone. By the way, Game Turbo is also where you do your custom mapping for popup triggers.

Gesture navigation

Gesture navigation is as you’d expect on the Poco F4 GT and works great, as it always does in MIUI. If you don’t enjoy looking at that eyesore too much, you can optionally remove the pointless white “pill” bar at the bottom.

There are other gestures, and we’ll get to those in a bit, but first let’s understand how the gesture shortcuts menu in Settings includes gestures and button presses in a rather confusing way.

Gesture navigation settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture navigation settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture navigation settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

That aside, this is one of those menus that we imagine most people will never access, but there are some neat things inside. You can set Google Assistant to long press the power button, set the camera to launch with a double press of the power button or the volume down button, or both, and make the LED flash shine like a torch . Press the power button,  then there’s an option to double- or triple-tap the back of the phone for specific things — like taking a screenshot, accessing Control Center or the notification shade, opening the calculator app, going to silent mode, etc. A list of similar items can also be set up by double-tapping the fingerprint sensor.

Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Gesture shortcuts settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

These are all undeniable features – but once you know they’re there, they might come in handy in your day-to-day life, which is why we wanted to shed some light on this menu and its contents. You can even set some popup triggers by double-tapping as well as long-pressing. Although this is a more limited list you can choose from here – you can launch the camera, record video, record the screen, record audio, turn on the flashlight, go to silent mode and change the vibration give

Why are the options here more limited compared to what you can choose from for the back tap or fingerprint sensor? who knows. Why these features in particular? Again, they’re obviously a small subset of what the phone can do, and we can’t say we fully understand how to choose them, but we think having these options is better than not. And since none of these are on by default, it’s not like they’re going to get in the way of easily using the box or anything.

Pop-up triggers settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Pop-up triggers settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Pop-up triggers settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Pop-up triggers settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Pop-up triggers settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Back to the triggers, you can assign them one of four sound effects that go off every time you open them and a color animation, just in case you need to play up the fact that you have a gaming phone. room without uttering a single word

Bugs

Unfortunately, our time with the Poco F4 GT wasn’t without its glitches, as we ran into a few issues. Unfortunately this is becoming a recurring issue with Xiaomi / Redmi / Poco stable devices, and we hope the companies are planning to improve software quality control in the near future – it’s definitely needed.

Especially since the updates are so infrequent – ​​it usually takes months for a new one to appear, which means at least that’s how long you’ll have to live with whatever new bug one introduces. This is another reason why more updates are recommended, but so far, these three brands have gone their own way.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Before we begin, let’s just add the usual caveat – depending on how you use your phone, you may or may not care about one or more of these bugs. We list all the issues we found to give you an accurate idea of ​​what life is like with this phone. If you don’t care about any of them, great! But if one or more are important to you, you might want to wait for future updates to fix them before getting this phone.

The biggest bug for us was the Do Not Disturb (DND) mode, which simply didn’t work as it should. This is what happened to us during our time with the Xiaomi 12 Pro, which we also recently reviewed long-term, so this appears to be a fairly common issue with the latest MIUI 13 builds. We summarize the problem: DND mode should silence all notifications and allow only the “interruptions” you set. We did our usual setup, scheduled DND for when we’re asleep and only let calls through – and yet we still heard every single notification. Not much else to say about it – it simply doesn’t work.

Do Not Disturb settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Next, the sound quality via Bluetooth. There are some serious issues with the Dolby Atmos implementation on this phone, and unfortunately we can’t tell you exactly what they are. But what we can say is that we’ve never had to deal with Dolby Atmos settings before on any phone that supports Atmos. It’s generally on by default, and we left it that way, never touched the defaults, and everything was great.

We initially went the same route on the Poco F4 GT, but music sounded terrible through an array of speakers, headphones, and Bluetooth headphones. It was, for lack of a better word, much smaller than any phone we’re used to. And also much quieter. Note that we did not change any settings on the speakers or headphones before starting to use this phone.

The Xiaomi Poco F4 GT’s music listening experience was marred by any glitches that produced this thin sound that lacked any kind of depth. So, we started fiddling with the Atmos settings (for the first time, on any phone), and eventually found that the Voice was the best preset for our ears, along with a custom EQ that had all the levels on top. . The latter helped with volume, but even with these settings, the quality still wasn’t quite what we’re used to. It’s a strange feeling to get used to music playing a certain way on certain speakers and headphones, regardless of which phone it’s being used with, and then you get a device that changes that significantly, for the worse. Your mileage may obviously vary.

Dolby Atmos settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review Dolby Atmos settings - Poco F4 GT long-term review

While roaming, we had issues with the Wi-Fi Calling Quick Settings randomly showing up first (left), even after repeatedly manually moving it to another location. We assume this happens every time the phone connects to a different network (which often happens when roaming), but it’s completely unnecessary behavior and therefore, in our opinion, qualifies as a bug.

The pop-up app selector that appears when trying to open a specific file type seems broken, as tapping the More option doesn’t actually give you the app list as it should. Instead, it randomly selects a program for you and immediately opens said file in that program. This was maddening at first because the app we wanted was never on the home screen, but it seemed to fix itself over time without any software updates. So with that in mind, you may or may not ever encounter it.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Finally, a small tip: if you enter Mute/Silence mode, an icon will appear in the status bar to let you know it’s engaged. Everything is fine, but the icon is on the wrong side of the status bar. It’s right next to the clock on the left, where the notification icons would normally be – and this can make it feel like you’re constantly waiting for a notification, even when there isn’t. We’re not sure why other system-related icons can fit on the right side of the status bar, but this one can’t — and the same goes for the NFC icon when it’s on. There’s enough room for both on the right side, no need to get confused about placing them.

Xiaomi Poco F4 GT camera review

Gaming phones usually don’t excel in the camera department because resources are spent elsewhere – RGB LEDs, crazy cooling systems, “gaming looks”, that sort of thing. Or maybe gamers don’t care about the camera? At least this seems to be the thinking of smartphone manufacturers. We can’t confirm that, but we wanted to mention all of this so you have reasonable expectations going into this part of our review.

Let’s be clear: the Poco F4 GT’s cameras will never compete with existing flagships in terms of raw image quality. There’s no way you can get it for this price and still get all the bells and whistles of the game.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

With that said, let’s quickly point out that the camera app is the MIUI fare found on seemingly every Xiaomi, Redmi, and Poco device, so if you’ve ever used it, you’ll feel right at home. And even if you’ve only used other brands, camera apps these days are so similar that you’ll have no problem adjusting within minutes.

image quality

Now, on to our samples. The Poco F4 GT’s main camera is a 64-megapixel unit, which isn’t the biggest camera out there, and it doesn’t have optical image stabilization (OIS). The latter means that very long exposures at night require very steady hands or end up with blurry photos. The software knows this, so selfies with automatic night mode are very fast. Even the handheld night mode shots are some of the fastest we’ve ever seen.

But let’s start with daily examples. The primary snapper here is capable of outputting decent images that aren’t amazing but are still quite commendable. The level of detail is good, noise is kept to a minimum (although it can occasionally creep in), the dynamic range is very average, and there’s a good amount of contrast.

Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/124s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/100s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1226s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/873s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/860s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/787s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1122s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/799s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1105s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1208s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/449s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1139s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/886s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/954s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/536s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/429s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/560s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/873s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/476s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/159s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/148s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Colors on the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT can be oversaturated, more so than flagship devices usually do – this has been a recurring theme, where the lower the price of a phone, the more intense the color display. After all, most people like pops of color, so even though these colors are by no means natural, they might be pleasing to your eyes. We think they’re a bit high, but if they’re not high enough for you, turn on the AI ​​switch. You will either be impressed or disgusted by the results, but one thing is for sure – it will definitely elicit a strong response.

The 8-megapixel ultra-wide camera looks like an unremarkable proposition without autofocus – so no macro shooting of it. However, there’s a dedicated 2MP macro camera, which we haven’t used yet because its output is too low-res to be usable in most scenarios. If you simply must have some, check out the samples included in our regular review of the Poco F4 GT.

Anyway, back to ultrawide mode. Its daily shots are quite average, as the hardware shows. The level of detail is decent, the dynamic range is acceptable most of the time, and the colors are acceptable, but sometimes they can veer too much towards magenta.

Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/190s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/120s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1359s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1799s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1442s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/2280s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/709s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1696s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1190s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1026s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/822s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/476s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1026s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1057s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/1853s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/730s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/585s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/659s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/912s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/182s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 56, 1/315s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Press the 2x zoom button  in the viewfinder, and you’ll get images that look acceptable on a phone screen, but nothing more. Sure, they might be used for a quick social media share here and there where quality isn’t too important, but otherwise, this camera system definitely invites you to “zoom with your feet” whenever you can. . That’s not surprising as there’s no dedicated zoom lens on the Poco F4 GT, and no fancy ‘Super Res Zoom’ here either – it’s just a crop from the center of the main sensor.

Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1042s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/873s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/775s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/753s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1623s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1042s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1400s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/860s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/926s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1508s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/205s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/847s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/912s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1057s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1576s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/469s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/560s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/370s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/577s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/164s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/1360s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 55, 1/100s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 92, 1/100s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Daytime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/157s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

At night, Auto mode on the main camera with Bright Night Auto mode produces nice-looking photos with good dynamic range, similar daytime colors, good detail in well-lit areas, and low noise. On the other hand, shadows are too dark and lack detail.

Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3789, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 189, 1/33s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 1809, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3174, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 2990, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3249, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 693, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 532, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 5387, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 5810, 1/8s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 4199, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 4830, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 1116, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 4469, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3188, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Enter the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT’s manual Night Mode, and with a good boost in shadows, you’ll get much sharper images that look sharper as a result. The differences between Night Auto and Night Mode are steady, so we recommend switching to Night Mode whenever you have the time (provided you have the steady hands you need to shoot). On the other hand, Auto Night Mode is a definite plus for Auto Mode, so we’ll turn it on for when you’re in a rush.

Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 4150, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 268, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 2058, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3378, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3184, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3558, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 699, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 525, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 5820, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 7542, 1/8s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 4473, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 5547, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 1197, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 4872, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the main camera - f/1.9, ISO 3658, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

The ultra-wide camera is predictably bad at night. Auto night mode doesn’t work for it, so it doesn’t overexpose while severely under-exposing highlights. You will only find these useful if you like the “atmospheric” look or whatever you want to call it.

Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 1755, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 385, 1/33s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 908, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 1606, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 2616, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 848, 1/20s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 676, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 595, 1/25s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3336, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 4800, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 4800, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3912, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 2109, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3316, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3181, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

The manual night mode helps, as it turns everything on, but at the cost of overall smoothness. We recommend avoiding ultra-wide mode in low-light situations, but if you insist on using it, night mode is the way to go – provided you have steady hands, as each shot takes a few seconds.

Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 2081, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3356, 1/11s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3313, 1/11s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 3736, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 689, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 1402, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 4931, 1/9s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 5357, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode samples from the ultrawide - f/2.2, ISO 1932, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

The 2x night shots also lack automatic night mode functionality, resulting in shots with blown-out highlights and very dark shadows, which is far from ideal. If you look closely, you will also hardly miss a “watercolor effect”.

Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 282, 1/33s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 743, 1/25s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1930, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2919, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 512, 1/34s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 4548, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 7809, 1/14s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2481, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 5273, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1627, 1/25s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 4482, 1/17s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Nighttime zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1139, 1/20s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

This, unfortunately, does not go away when using night mode, but at least it restores the highlights to some extent and enhances the shadows somewhat. Unfortunately, it oversharpens everything, so it’s all a trade-off. We recommend avoiding 2x mode and simply “zoom with your feet” if needed and it can be done. Otherwise, it’s impossible to tell which 2x mode is better, as each has its own unique drawbacks.

Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1865, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2097, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2433, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1792, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 501, 1/13s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2522, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 3835, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2236, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 2963, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1016, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 3149, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Night Mode zoom samples - f/1.9, ISO 1357, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Selfies are good, if not outstanding. During the day, you get excellent dynamic range, pleasing (if not quite natural) colors and accurate skin tones. The level of detail is good but not great. If you zoom in, you’ll see a lot of smoothness and a lot of sharpening liberally applied. But if you don’t pixelpip, these are mostly pretty usable.

Portrait mode photos deliver with good subject detection, although separation sometimes fails here and there. At night, the screen flash is your friend, as it’s not as bright as many others we’ve used so far. This means that while your face may not be as bright as other phones, you can still make out your surroundings in photos because the face brightness doesn’t wash out everything around it. Taking selfies with screen flash is an exercise in patience (and holding still), however, and if you move even a little, it’s bound to get some blur.

Selfies: Portrait Mode off/on during daytime, Screen flash off/on at night - f/2.2, ISO 277, 1/120s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Selfies: Portrait Mode off/on during daytime, Screen flash off/on at night - f/2.2, ISO 273, 1/120s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Selfies: Portrait Mode off/on during daytime, Screen flash off/on at night - f/2.2, ISO 136, 1/120s - Poco F4 GT long-term review
Selfies: Portrait Mode off/on during daytime, Screen flash off/on at night - f/2.2, ISO 136, 1/120s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Selfies: Portrait Mode off/on during daytime, Screen flash off/on at night - f/2.2, ISO 7000, 1/10s - Poco F4 GT long-term review Selfies: Portrait Mode off/on during daytime, Screen flash off/on at night - f/2.2, ISO 5377, 1/11s - Poco F4 GT long-term review

Overall the Poco F4 GT cameras are average. As expected based on the specs, the top end is the flagship, but it’s far from even flagship performance. That doesn’t mean it produces bad images – it doesn’t. They are good, but could be better. So if cameras are important to you, this is definitely not the phone for you, but for a casual shot here and there every now and then, it does the job well enough.

Summary

The Poco F4 GT is the first gaming phone we’ve reviewed in a long time, and we didn’t know what to expect. Is it difficult to use for non-gaming stuff? Does it skimp on other features to give you gaming essentials like RGB LEDs and pop-up triggers and a large cooling compartment inside?

As it turns out, yes, but only to an extent. Pop-up clips may not bother you at all, or you may constantly feel like they clutter up the right side of the device unnecessarily. This can be especially true if you’re not a “pro gamer”, and therefore don’t really have much real-world use for them. But if you play the game a lot, they add up, and you probably won’t mind them being there and moving the volume rocker to the left.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

In terms of other features to give you a complete gaming package, the cameras are pretty average, and this is one area where this has happened. 

The Poco F4 GT came with the top chipset at the time and even paired it with a large vapor chamber for cooling. This, unfortunately, wasn’t enough to completely alleviate the documented overheating problems of the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1, and it’s still a lot of pressure in intensive games, starting after only a few minutes.

So the weird part about having the first gaming phone for a long-term review is that, if you think about it, it kind of fails in a great gaming phone because of all the pressure. Not bad – don’t get me wrong, but if you’re all about the pro gamer life, you should probably go for a phone with a Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 or get an instant cooling attachment. Otherwise, if you’re looking for a high-performance device for anything other than intensive hour-long pro gaming sessions, the Poco F4 GT will suit you well.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

The software has been a mixed bag. On the one hand, MIUI has a very unique design language and flourishes here and there in the animations and vibration shakes it uses extensively. On the other hand, the categorization of features in Settings seems almost random at times, and the Settings menu itself is huge and hard to navigate. We also think the leather might be overdue for a new coat of paint, but you might disagree.

Similarly, we feel that software support – when it comes to updates – is sorely lacking. Every few months an update doesn’t match some of Poco’s competitors, and things get worse because the updates are far from bug-free. So if you encounter a new bug, you are stuck with it for months.

Speaking of which, there are a few MIUI bugs that we encountered on the Poco F4 GT. So we hope that Xiaomi, Redmi and Poco will invest more in software quality control in the very near future, while realizing that the current price may be unsustainable in the long term. After all, it’s all a trading game.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

Battery life on the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT has been excellent – ​​not the best we’ve seen, but not far off. And even if your use case is much more compact than ours and you need a quick charge during the day, it won’t be a problem thanks to Super Fast Charging. It’s still amazing to this day to see a device go from scratch to full in less than 20 minutes! The fingerprint scanner is one of the most accurate we’ve ever used, the vibration motor is among the best, and the speaker performance is helped a lot by their gaming-friendly position (which we bet has a lot of media consumption, too. Friendly, too). .

The screen is pretty good, but not among the best out there – understandable at this price. The resolution similarly isn’t as good as the flagships, but we really don’t think anyone will notice the difference in real life without looking for it. While the Poco F4 GT looks like a gaming phone on closer inspection, it won’t really stand out from a distance if you have it in a different color that isn’t yellow – and that might be something you’ll appreciate.

Poco F4 GT long-term review

The bottom line is that the Xiaomi Poco F4 GT is a very good phone, just not one that excels at its unique selling point. We recommend looking at this phone as a very affordable phone with a flagship chipset, and consider the gaming features as the odd bonus on the side. You should also be able to enjoy the absolutely amazing camera system. That being said, mid-range cameras are pretty much par for the “flagship killer” or “affordable flagship” space, and the Poco F4 GT would probably be best described as a flagship killer with a gaming twist.

If you want to feel different, but not so different that you feel uncomfortable, that’s great. It delivers very well in some areas (battery life, screen quality, handling, speakers), in others (smoothness, charging speed, vibration motor, fingerprint sensor) and still not so much in others. Camera image quality, stable performance). It’s definitely an oddball package, but some people are oddballs with oddball needs, and if you match what the Poco F4 GT can offer, you’ll have a great time.

Source: GSMARENA.COM

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The best mid-range Xiaomi phones

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The best mid-range Xiaomi phones
In this article, we introduce the best mid-range Xiaomi phones that offer satisfactory performance at a reasonable price.

The best mid-range Xiaomi phones

Today’s flagships are so expensive that you have to spend a lot of money to buy them. It is true that the performance of these devices is very successful and they can be trusted to do various tasks, their astronomical prices and the increase in the exchange rate have made most people buy mid-range phones.

Mid-range phones are phones that have better quality and offer good performance compared to budget devices. Among the well-known brands, Xiaomi’s mid-range phones are good options that meet many user needs.

In addition to the price of the phone, other factors such as build quality, suitable design, processing power, charging time, speed, efficiency, and warranty are other important features when buying a smartphone. For this reason, in this article, we collect the best mid-range Xiaomi phones and introduce them to you.

Table of Contents
  • The best mid-range Xiaomi phone
  • Redmi 12
  • Poco M6 Pro
  • Poco X6
  • The best mid-range Xiaomi phone for gaming
  • Poco F4
  • Poco X6 Pro
  • The best mid-range Xiaomi phone in terms of camera
  • Redmi Note 13 Pro 5G

The best mid-range Xiaomi phone

At the beginning of the article, we have gone to the best mid-range smartphones of Xiaomi, which offer good features and capabilities considering their relatively reasonable price. To buy these devices, you don’t need to spend a lot of money like buying flagships, and their performance is also satisfactory.

Next, we will introduce some top mid-range Xiaomi phones.

Redmi 12

Xiaomi Redmi 12 phone

As the cheapest mid-range Xiaomi phone on our list, the Xiaomi Redmi 12 has decent features that are enough for a wide range of users.

The material used in the body of the phone is all plastic, which may not be pleasant for some users; But considering the price and target users, it is normal. The screen size is 6.79 inches and its panel type is IPS; But since its resolution is FHD and its refresh rate is 90 Hz, the content being played will have good speed and quality.

The main camera is 50 megapixels and the selfie camera is 8 megapixels, which capture high-quality photos in good lighting conditions. The ultra-wide and macro cameras of Xiaomi phones do not perform very well and you cannot count on their photography.

If the other parts of the Xiaomi phone don’t catch your eye, probably the 12nm MediaTek G88 processor and the decent 8GB RAM capacity will. With such hardware, you can easily open various programs and not be afraid of hanging the phone. The phone’s processor is not suitable for heavy games; But in daily use, there is no shortage. Redmi 12 uses a 5,000 mAh battery that is fully charged in about 1 hour and 20 minutes with the 18-watt charger inside the box.

Poco M6 Pro

Front and back panel of Xiaomi Poco M6 Pro mobile phone black / Xiaomi Poco M6 Pro

Poco M6 Pro is one of Xiaomi’s new midranges that uses the new design language of this company’s products and is considered an attractive option.

The 6.67-inch screen of the Xiaomi phone uses FHD resolution and an OLED panel, which has good impact resistance with Gorilla Glass 5 coating; But the frame and body of the phone are made of plastic, which is not far from the mind considering its price range. Also, its 120 Hz refresh rate makes gaming and web browsing very smooth and smooth. This feature is less common in mid-range Samsung phones in this price range.

The Mediatek Helio G99 Ultra processor has a good speed in executing popular commands and games. The version we listed comes with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage, which sounds great for a mid-range phone.

The set of Xiaomi phone cameras may not perform as well as it seems from their megapixels. Xiaomi has used a 64-megapixel sensor for the main camera, which is also accompanied by ultra-wide and macro cameras. Camera performance is satisfactory only in good lighting conditions, and for low-light environments, you should limit your expectations.

Other features of the Poco M6 Pro include a 67-watt high-speed charger inside the box and a fingerprint sensor under the display, both of which can increase the value of purchasing the phone for many users.

Poco X6

Front and back panel of Xiaomi Poco X6 blue mobile phone / Xiaomi Poco X6

Xiaomi Poco X6, as a serious competitor of Galaxy A54 and of course Galaxy A35 in the market, has attracted a lot of attention. Xiaomi’s mid-range uses a relatively new Snapdragon 7s Gen 2 processor, which shows good stability and performance in heavy programs and games, and has no problem running light games with the best graphics. Unfortunately, the Poco X6 comes with the MIUI user interface and does not use HyperOS like the Pro version. Such a choice will definitely have an impact on receiving phone updates in the future.

Xiaomi’s attractive mid-range OLED display panel has a resolution of 1220 x 2712 pixels, which is slightly better than FHD resolution. Such specifications will bring smooth scrolling and performance along with a 120Hz refresh rate. Also, the display supports the Dolby Vision standard and thanks to the 12-bit panel, it can display 68 billion colors.

The main camera of the Xiaomi phone is 64 megapixels, which records high-quality photos in different light conditions; But since Poco series phones focus more on processing functions, its camera may not reach the Galaxy A54.

The body of the Xiaomi phone is entirely plastic; But the Victos Gorilla Glass cover is used to protect the screen, which is mostly reserved for premium and flagship phones. Poco X6’s battery capacity is 5100 mAh, which takes about 40 minutes to fully charge with the 67-watt charger inside the box.

The best mid-range Xiaomi phone for gaming

Our expectation from the best Xiaomi gaming phones is that they can provide acceptable hardware and visual performance, and this is related to several factors, including the refresh rate of the display and the power of the processor.

Among Xiaomi’s mid-range devices, there are options that, in addition to a relatively reasonable price, also offer satisfactory performance when playing games. We will introduce them next.

Poco F4

Poco F4

Currently, one of the best affordable phones in the field of gaming is the Xiaomi Poco F4 phone, which is equipped with Qualcomm’s flagship Snapdragon 870 processor.

Poco F4 is equipped with an OLED screen with a resolution of 1080 x 2400 pixels and a refresh rate of 120 Hz, which also supports HDR10 Plus and Dolby Vision technology. Xiaomi has considered a 64-megapixel sensor for the main camera, which is accompanied by 8 and 2-megapixel sensors for the ultrawide and macro cameras. The selfie camera is also 20 megapixels, which is considered a suitable option for video conversations with a suitable resolution.

A relatively large 4500 mAh battery with a 67W fast charger in the box, dual stereo speakers, and Gorilla Glass 5 protective cover are other features that improve the value of buying this gaming phone.

Poco X6 Pro

The front and back panel of the yellow Xiaomi Poco X6 Pro mobile phone / Xiaomi Poco X6 Pro

The basic version of Poco X6 Pro, which we introduced earlier, is considered one of the best mid-range Xiaomi gaming phones and has exceptional processing performance in various games.

Poco X6 Pro uses the MediaTek Dimensity 8300 Ultra processor along with 12 GB of RAM and 512 GB of UFS 4.0 storage space. The use of such powerful hardware in the mid-range of Xiaomi allows the Poco X6 Pro to run most games on the best graphics.

Poco X6 Pro’s 6.67-inch OLED screen has a 1.5K resolution and a 120Hz refresh rate and is capable of displaying 68 billion colors. Of course, like other Poco models, this phone does not have much definition in the camera department and uses a 64-megapixel sensor with optical image stabilization for its wide camera.

Fortunately, the Poco phone is equipped with HyperOS from the beginning and will receive operating system updates for up to three years. We recommend that you don’t miss the Poco X6 Pro review on Zoomit for a more detailed review and to see various tests.

The best mid-range Xiaomi phone in terms of camera

In the guide to buy the best Xiaomi phone, complete explanations are given about all Xiaomi devices that are worth buying; But if only the phone’s camera is the main criterion for your purchase, you should consider other Xiaomi phones.

Next, we will introduce the best mid-range Xiaomi phone that, considering its price, captures high-quality images and can be trusted for filming.

Redmi Note 13 Pro 5G

Redmi Note 13 Pro 5G

While the cameras of the 4G and 5G models of Redmi Note 13 Pro use the same technical specifications, due to the use of a different processor in the 5G version, the photos recorded in this model are of better quality.

Just like the Poco X6 that we introduced earlier, the Redmi Note 13 Pro 5G also uses the second-generation Snapdragon 7s processor, which, combined with the 200-megapixel Xiaomi camera, leads to very good results in various photography scenarios. For users who prioritize cameras in mid-range phones, Redmi Note 13 Pro takes clear photos in poor lighting conditions.

In the video recording department, Redmi Note 13 Pro can record 4K videos at 30 frames per second and 1080p videos at 120 frames per second, which seem to be excellent specifications for a mid-range phone.

Other specifications of the Xiaomi phone include an OLED screen with a refresh rate of 120 Hz, a 5100 mAh battery with a 67-watt high-speed charger, and a fingerprint sensor under the screen. For more tests and reviews, don’t miss the Redmi Note 13 Pro 5G and 4G review.

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How to install Windows 11 without a Microsoft account?

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Windows 11
In this tutorial, you will learn how to start Windows 11 without the Internet and without the need to enter an email.

How to install Windows 11 without a Microsoft account?

Based on Microsoft’s decision and unlike how to install Windows 10, users must enter their Microsoft email or any other account to connect their Windows user account with that person’s email for the initial setup of Windows 11; Otherwise, users will not be able to complete the Windows 11 installation process.

This means that the user must be connected to the Internet to start Windows 11, and it is not possible to create a local account. This incident resulted in the protest of many users; Because in many cases, due to the lack of necessary drivers, users could not connect to the Internet in the Windows setup interface or Out of box experience, or they did not want to enter their email at all.

However, it is not impossible to install Windows 11 without the internet. According to its usual habit, Microsoft is not strict in the field of many of its decisions and policies, and like its own solution to avoid the lack of a TPM 1.2 chip for installing Windows 11 or existing solutions for installing Windows 11 on incompatible systems, with a few simple moves, you can force the connection to the Internet and Bypasses email log in at Windows startup.

If you are one of those people who are stuck on the Internet connection or email login screen when starting Windows, with the help of this tutorial, you can easily solve your problem and complete the steps to install Windows 11 without a Microsoft account.

Windows 11 setup without internet

There are 4 ways to boot Windows 11 without the internet that still work and are very easy to do.

Bypassing the Internet connection with Bypass code

If the Windows 11 setup steps are stuck on the Let’s connect you to a network screen due to the lack of Internet connection, the Next button will be grayed out until a stable connection is established, and you will not be able to proceed to the next steps.

Launching Windows 11 without internet

Not only in this situation but also if you need to enter the username and password through the portal to enter the network, you cannot do anything and you have to bypass this step. In this situation, follow the steps below:

  • In the mentioned screen, press the Shift+F10 keys to open the command prompt window.
    • Enter OOBE\BYPASSNRO and press enter.
Launching Windows 11 without internet
  • Next, your device will restart. Go through the setup process again until you reach the Let’s connect you to a Network page. Now, on this page, you will see that the I don’t have internet option has been added next to the Next option. Click on it.
Launching Windows 11 without internet
  • On the next page, click Continue with limited setup.
Launching Windows 11 without internet
  • After that, the page for creating a local account will be in front of you, and by entering the desired name and the password on the next page, the local account will be created and the Windows 11 setup process will be completed. If you leave the password box blank, the account will be created without a password.
Setup Windows 11 with local account

End the connection process with the Task Manager

On the same Let’s connect you to a network page, you can delete the running process that forces you to connect to the Internet and enter the Microsoft account by running the task manager.

  • Open the command line window by pressing the Shift + F10 buttons and type taskmgr and press enter to open the task manager.
Open Task Manager when installing Windows 11
  • You can also open the task manager window by pressing Ctrl + Shift + Esc.
  • After opening the task manager, look for Network Connection Flow in the Processes section. You can also use the search section to find it.
Open Task Manager when installing Windows 11
  • Then select Network Connection Flow and click on the End task option. After that, close the task manager window and type the word exit to exit the command line window and press enter.
  • Now you will be faced with loading animations and you will go directly to the local account creation section. Enter your desired name and continue the Windows setup process.

Remove the Internet connection with the command line

If you are unable to kill the internet connection process through the task manager, you can do it through the command line.

  • On the Let’s Connect you to a network page, press Shift + F10 to open the command line.
  • In the window that opens, enter the following code and press enter.
taskkill /F /IM oobenetworkconnectionflow.exe
Internet disconnection code
  • After the command is executed, close the command line window and continue the Windows 11 setup process.

Skip the Internet connection page with Alt + F4 buttons

Such a method may not work for all users, but if you cannot bypass the forced Internet connection and enter the Microsoft account with any of the above methods, on the Let’s Connect you to a network page, press the Alt + F4 combination buttons to force the Internet connection window.

Read more: The best-hidden features for Windows 11

If nothing happens after pressing the mentioned buttons once, try pressing the buttons several times in a row. Alt + F4 keys in the Windows environment can also be used to close running programs or open the shutdown menu.

The above methods work in all versions of Windows 11. If you encounter any problem in performing any of the steps, share with us in the comments section.

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Unveiling of OpenAI new artificial intelligence capabilities

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OpenAI

OpenAI claims that its free GPT-4o model can talk, laugh, sing, and see like a human. The company is also releasing a desktop version of ChatGPT’s large language model.

 Unveiling of OpenAI new artificial intelligence capabilities

Yesterday, OpenAI introduced the GPT-4o artificial intelligence model, which is a completely new model of the company’s artificial intelligence, which according to OpenAI is a step closer to a much more natural human-computer interaction.
This new model accepts any combination of text, audio, and image as input and can produce output in all three formats. It can also detect emotions, allow the user to interrupt it mid-speech, and respond almost as quickly as a human during a conversation.
In the live broadcast of the introduction of this new model, Meera Moratti, Chief Technology Officer of OpenAI, said: “The special thing about GPT-4o is that GPT-4 level intelligence has been made available to everyone, including our free users. This is the first time we’ve taken a big step forward in ease of use.
During the unveiling of the model, OpenAI demonstrated the GPT-4o, which translates live between English and Italian, with its intuitive ability to help a researcher solve a linear equation on paper in an instant, just by listening to The breaths of an OpenAI executive give him advice on deep breathing.
The letter “o” in the name of the GPT-4o model stands for the word “Omni”, which is a reference to the multifaceted capabilities of this model.
OpenAI said that GPT-4o is trained with text, images, and audio, meaning all input and output is processed by a neural network. This differs from the company’s previous models, including the GPT-3.5 and GPT-4, which allowed users to ask questions just by speaking, but then converted the speech to text. This would cause tone and emotion to be lost and interactions to slow down.
OpenAI will make this new model available for free to everyone, including ChatGPT users, over the next few weeks, and will also initially release a desktop version of ChatGPT for Apple computers (Mac) for users who have purchased a subscription, starting today. They will have access to it. The introduction of the new OpenAI model took place one day before the Google I/O event, which is the company’s annual developer conference.
OpenAI
It should be noted that shortly after OpenAI introduced GPT-4o, Google also presented a version of its artificial intelligence known as Gemini with similar capabilities.
While the GPT-4 model excelled at tasks related to image and text analysis, the GPT-4o model integrates speech processing and expands its range of capabilities.

Natural human-computer interaction

According to OpenAI, the GPT-4o model is a step towards a much more natural human-computer interaction that accepts any combination of text, audio, and image as input and produces any combination of text, audio and image.
This model can respond to voice inputs in less than 232 milliseconds, with an average speed of 320 milliseconds, which is similar to the response time of humans in a conversation.
This model matches the performance of the GPT-4 Turbo model on English text and code with a significant improvement in converting text to non-English languages while being much faster and 50% cheaper via application programming interface (API). The GPT-4o model is especially better in visual and audio understanding compared to existing models.

What exactly does the introduction of this model mean for users?

The GPT-4o model significantly enhances the experience of ChatGPT, OpenAI’s wildly popular AI chatbot. Users can now interact with ChatGPT like a personal assistant, ask it questions and even hang it up wherever they want.
Additionally, as mentioned, OpenAI is introducing a desktop version of ChatGPT along with a revamped user interface.
“We recognize the increasing complexity of these models, but our goal is to make the interaction experience more intuitive and seamless,” Moratti emphasized. We want users to focus on working with GPT instead of being distracted by the UI. Our new model can reason text, audio, and video in real-time. This model is versatile, fun to work with, and a step toward a much more natural form of human-computer interaction, and even human-computer-computer interaction.
The GPT-4o model has also been extensively reviewed by more than 70 experts in areas such as social psychology, bias and fairness, and misinformation to identify risks introduced or enhanced by the newly added methods. OpenAI has used these learnings to develop safety interventions to improve the safety of interacting with GPT-4o. The members of the OpenAI team demonstrated their audio skills during the public presentation of this new model. A researcher named Mark Chen emphasized its ability to gauge emotions and noted its adaptability to user interruptions.
Chen demonstrated the model’s versatility by requesting a bedtime story in a variety of tones, from dramatic to robotic, and even had it read to him. As mentioned, this new model is available for free to all ChatGPT users. Until now, GPT-4 class models were only available to people who paid a monthly subscription.
“This is important to us because we want to make great AI tools available to everyone,” said OpenAI CEO Sam Altman.

Strong market for generative artificial intelligence

OpenAI is leading the way in productive AI alongside Microsoft and Google, as companies across sectors rush to integrate AI-powered chatbots into their services to stay competitive.
For example, Anthropic, a competitor of OpenAI, recently unveiled its first corporate proposal to Apple to provide a free program for iPhones.
“We recognize that GPT-4o audio presentations present new risks,” OpenAI said in a statement. Today we’re publicly releasing text and image inputs and text outputs, and in the coming weeks and months, we’ll be working on the technical infrastructure, post-training usability, and security necessary to release other methods. For example, at startup, audio outputs are limited to a set of predefined sounds and adhere to our existing security policies. We will share more details about the full range of GPT-4o methods in a future system.
OpenAI
According to the report, the generative AI market saw a staggering $29.1 billion in investment across nearly 700 deals in 2023, up more than 260 percent from the previous year. Predictions indicate that the yield of this market will exceed one trillion dollars in the next decade. However, there are concerns about the rapid deployment of untested services by academics and ethicists who are troubled by the technology’s potential to perpetuate prejudice.
Since launching in November 2022, ChatGPT’s chatbot has broken records as the fastest-growing user base in history, with nearly 100 million weekly active users. OpenAI reports that more than 92% of the world’s top 500 companies use it.
At the presentation event last night, Moratti answered some questions from the audience and when he spoke in fluent Italian and the artificial intelligence translated his words into English, the hall was filled with excitement.
There is more. This means the next time you take a selfie, OpenAI’s artificial intelligence can assess your exact emotions. All you have to do is select a selfie and ask ChatGPT to tell you how you feel.
It should be said that OpenAI employees were so happy that ChatGPT asked them why they were so happy!

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